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Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics.

Objective: To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics.

Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic settings.

Results: In total 1,015 subjects (73.2% females, mean age 32.5 years) completed the survey. Education level was college or higher in 72.8%. Thirty-one percent had been diagnosed with a skin disorder, atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis being the most frequent diagnoses (33.7% and 16.8%, respectively). The frequency of makeup/sunscreen/functional cosmetics use, amount of sunscreen use, recognition of functional cosmetics, and knowledge of shelf life were significantly correlated with level of education. Among “functional cosmetics,” whitening products were used most frequently (29.2%). Regardless of education level, 79.2% purchased cosmetics without checking ingredients, and 85.7% were unaware of the all-ingredient-labelling regulations, and yet subjects considered ingredient the most important factor when purchasing a product.

Conclusion: Outpatient subjects in their twenties and thirties are the most knowledgeable about cosmetics in Korea.

No MeSH data available.


Period-after-opening symbol signifying a shelf life of 12 months after opening.
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Figure 6: Period-after-opening symbol signifying a shelf life of 12 months after opening.

Mentions: However, when asked about the meaning of the period-after-opening (PAO) symbol (Fig. 6), only 39.7% of subjects said they know what it means; 48.3% of those respondents said it means “the product can be used for 12 months,” 44.5% said precisely that it means “the product can be used for 12 months after opening,” but 6.3% said it means something about the volume of the product. There was a significant difference between men and women in knowledge of the symbol (p<0.001), with 22.1% of men and 43.0% of women having knowledge. The higher the education attained, the more likely the subject was to know what the PAO symbol means (p<0.009). According to age, the knowledge peaked in the second decade and decreased gradually in adjacent age groups on either side (p<0.001). More patients visiting private clinics knew the meaning of PAO symbol than patients visiting university hospitals (52.7% vs. 34.1%, p<0.001).


Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics
Period-after-opening symbol signifying a shelf life of 12 months after opening.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383743&req=5

Figure 6: Period-after-opening symbol signifying a shelf life of 12 months after opening.
Mentions: However, when asked about the meaning of the period-after-opening (PAO) symbol (Fig. 6), only 39.7% of subjects said they know what it means; 48.3% of those respondents said it means “the product can be used for 12 months,” 44.5% said precisely that it means “the product can be used for 12 months after opening,” but 6.3% said it means something about the volume of the product. There was a significant difference between men and women in knowledge of the symbol (p<0.001), with 22.1% of men and 43.0% of women having knowledge. The higher the education attained, the more likely the subject was to know what the PAO symbol means (p<0.009). According to age, the knowledge peaked in the second decade and decreased gradually in adjacent age groups on either side (p<0.001). More patients visiting private clinics knew the meaning of PAO symbol than patients visiting university hospitals (52.7% vs. 34.1%, p<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics.

Objective: To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics.

Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic settings.

Results: In total 1,015 subjects (73.2% females, mean age 32.5 years) completed the survey. Education level was college or higher in 72.8%. Thirty-one percent had been diagnosed with a skin disorder, atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis being the most frequent diagnoses (33.7% and 16.8%, respectively). The frequency of makeup/sunscreen/functional cosmetics use, amount of sunscreen use, recognition of functional cosmetics, and knowledge of shelf life were significantly correlated with level of education. Among &ldquo;functional cosmetics,&rdquo; whitening products were used most frequently (29.2%). Regardless of education level, 79.2% purchased cosmetics without checking ingredients, and 85.7% were unaware of the all-ingredient-labelling regulations, and yet subjects considered ingredient the most important factor when purchasing a product.

Conclusion: Outpatient subjects in their twenties and thirties are the most knowledgeable about cosmetics in Korea.

No MeSH data available.