Limits...
Low-Level Light Therapy with 410 nm Light Emitting Diode Suppresses Collagen Synthesis in Human Keloid Fibroblasts: An In Vitro Study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Keloids are characterized by excessive collagen deposition in the dermis, in which transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling plays an important role. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is reported as effective in preventing keloids in clinical reports, recently. To date, studies investigating the effect of LLLT on keloid fibroblasts are extremely rare.

Objective: We investigated the effect of LLLT with blue (410 nm), red (630 nm), and infrared (830 nm) light on the collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts.

Methods: Keloid fibroblasts were isolated from keloid-revision surgery samples and irradiated using 410-, 630-, 830-nm light emitting diode twice, with a 24-hour interval at 10 J/cm2. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 24 and 48 hours and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed. Western blot analysis was also performed in 48 hours after last irradiation. The genes and proteins of collagen type I, TGF-β1, Smad3, and Smad7 were analyzed.

Results: We observed no statistically significant change in the viability of keloid fibroblasts after irradiation. Collagen type I was the only gene whose expression significantly decreased after irradiation at 410 nm when compared to the non-irradiated control. Western blot analysis showed that LLLT at 410 nm lowered the protein levels of collagen type I compared to the control.

Conclusion: LLLT at 410 nm decreased the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts and might be effective in preventing keloid formation in their initial stage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Low-level light therapy suppressed the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts irradiated with 410 nm light. TGF-β1: transforming growth factor β1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383739&req=5

Figure 3: Low-level light therapy suppressed the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts irradiated with 410 nm light. TGF-β1: transforming growth factor β1.

Mentions: Irradiation at 410 nm reduced the protein levels of collagen type I in 48 hours. However, we observed no differences between irradiated samples and the control for TGF-β1, Smad3, and Smad7 (Fig. 3).


Low-Level Light Therapy with 410 nm Light Emitting Diode Suppresses Collagen Synthesis in Human Keloid Fibroblasts: An In Vitro Study
Low-level light therapy suppressed the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts irradiated with 410 nm light. TGF-β1: transforming growth factor β1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383739&req=5

Figure 3: Low-level light therapy suppressed the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts irradiated with 410 nm light. TGF-β1: transforming growth factor β1.
Mentions: Irradiation at 410 nm reduced the protein levels of collagen type I in 48 hours. However, we observed no differences between irradiated samples and the control for TGF-β1, Smad3, and Smad7 (Fig. 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Keloids are characterized by excessive collagen deposition in the dermis, in which transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling plays an important role. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) is reported as effective in preventing keloids in clinical reports, recently. To date, studies investigating the effect of LLLT on keloid fibroblasts are extremely rare.

Objective: We investigated the effect of LLLT with blue (410 nm), red (630 nm), and infrared (830 nm) light on the collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts.

Methods: Keloid fibroblasts were isolated from keloid-revision surgery samples and irradiated using 410-, 630-, 830-nm light emitting diode twice, with a 24-hour interval at 10 J/cm2. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 24 and 48 hours and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed. Western blot analysis was also performed in 48 hours after last irradiation. The genes and proteins of collagen type I, TGF-β1, Smad3, and Smad7 were analyzed.

Results: We observed no statistically significant change in the viability of keloid fibroblasts after irradiation. Collagen type I was the only gene whose expression significantly decreased after irradiation at 410 nm when compared to the non-irradiated control. Western blot analysis showed that LLLT at 410 nm lowered the protein levels of collagen type I compared to the control.

Conclusion: LLLT at 410 nm decreased the expression of collagen type I in keloid fibroblasts and might be effective in preventing keloid formation in their initial stage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus