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Postdischarge growth assessment in very low birth weight infants

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The goal of nutritional support for very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants from birth to term is to match the in utero growth rates; however, this is rarely achieved.

Methods: We evaluated postdischarge growth patterns and growth failure in 81 Korean VLBW infants through a retrospective study. Weight and height were measured and calculated based on age percentile distribution every 3 months until age 24 months. Growth failure was defined as weight and height below the 10th percentile at 24 months. For the subgroup analysis, small-for-gestational age (SGA) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants were evaluated. The growth patterns based on the Korean, World Health Organization (WHO), or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standard were serially compared over time.

Results: At postconception age (PCA) 40 weeks, 47 (58%) and 45 infants (55%) showed growth failure in terms of weight and height, respectively. At PCA 24 months, 20 infants (24%) showed growth failure for weight and 14 (18%) for height. Growth failure rates were higher for the SGA infants than for the appropriate-weight-for-gestational age infants at PCA 24 months (P=0.045 for weight and P=0.038 for height). Growth failure rates were higher for the ELBW infants than for the non-ELBW infants at PCA 24 months (P<0.001 for weight and P=0.003 for height). Significant differences were found among the WHO, CDC, and Korean standards (P<0.001).

Conclusion: Advancements in neonatal care have improved the catch-up growth of VLBW infants, but this is insufficient. Careful observation and aggressive interventions, especially in SGA and ELBW infants, are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Percentile of height from birth to postconception age (PCA) 24 months according to the Korean growth chart. P, percentile.
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Figure 2: Percentile of height from birth to postconception age (PCA) 24 months according to the Korean growth chart. P, percentile.

Mentions: Among total group, the growth failure proportion at PCA 40 weeks was 58% and that at PCA 24 months was 24% according to the Korean standard; these infants achieved significant catch-up growth (P<0.001) (Fig. 1). Birth heights for 21% of infants were <10th percentile, and none were >90th percentile. The percentage of infants with heights <10th percentile was 55% at PCA 40 weeks and 18% at PCA 24 months by the Korean standard, indicating that they had achieved significant catch-up growth (P<0.001) (Fig. 2).


Postdischarge growth assessment in very low birth weight infants
Percentile of height from birth to postconception age (PCA) 24 months according to the Korean growth chart. P, percentile.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383634&req=5

Figure 2: Percentile of height from birth to postconception age (PCA) 24 months according to the Korean growth chart. P, percentile.
Mentions: Among total group, the growth failure proportion at PCA 40 weeks was 58% and that at PCA 24 months was 24% according to the Korean standard; these infants achieved significant catch-up growth (P<0.001) (Fig. 1). Birth heights for 21% of infants were <10th percentile, and none were >90th percentile. The percentage of infants with heights <10th percentile was 55% at PCA 40 weeks and 18% at PCA 24 months by the Korean standard, indicating that they had achieved significant catch-up growth (P<0.001) (Fig. 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The goal of nutritional support for very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants from birth to term is to match the in utero growth rates; however, this is rarely achieved.

Methods: We evaluated postdischarge growth patterns and growth failure in 81 Korean VLBW infants through a retrospective study. Weight and height were measured and calculated based on age percentile distribution every 3 months until age 24 months. Growth failure was defined as weight and height below the 10th percentile at 24 months. For the subgroup analysis, small-for-gestational age (SGA) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants were evaluated. The growth patterns based on the Korean, World Health Organization (WHO), or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standard were serially compared over time.

Results: At postconception age (PCA) 40 weeks, 47 (58%) and 45 infants (55%) showed growth failure in terms of weight and height, respectively. At PCA 24 months, 20 infants (24%) showed growth failure for weight and 14 (18%) for height. Growth failure rates were higher for the SGA infants than for the appropriate-weight-for-gestational age infants at PCA 24 months (P=0.045 for weight and P=0.038 for height). Growth failure rates were higher for the ELBW infants than for the non-ELBW infants at PCA 24 months (P&lt;0.001 for weight and P=0.003 for height). Significant differences were found among the WHO, CDC, and Korean standards (P&lt;0.001).

Conclusion: Advancements in neonatal care have improved the catch-up growth of VLBW infants, but this is insufficient. Careful observation and aggressive interventions, especially in SGA and ELBW infants, are needed.

No MeSH data available.