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A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant

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ABSTRACT

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, multilobulated, circumferential, polypoid lesions with mucoid discharge from the rectum. He was diagnosed with cap polyposis by endoscopy and histologic examination. He was treated with surgical resection, and was closely followed up. In the relevant literature, there is no report of cap polyposis in an infant. We report the first case of cap polyposis in the youngest infant.

No MeSH data available.


About 1-cm in size small remnant mucosal polypoid lesions were seen at the inner anus on follow-up endoscopy.
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Figure 6: About 1-cm in size small remnant mucosal polypoid lesions were seen at the inner anus on follow-up endoscopy.

Mentions: After surgical treatment, he did not have hematochezia for 5 months. Afterwards, he experienced recurrent bloody and mucoid stools. Colonoscopy revealed very small polypoid lesions at the previous location (Fig. 6). The lesions were too small to be removed through surgery. After mesalazine enema was administered, his clinical symptoms improved, and he no longer had bloody stools. At two months after recurrence, endoscopy showed that the size of polyps had decreased. Daily mesalazine enema was continued for 6 months prior to its discontinuation. The patient did not have any relapse for more than 12 months thereafter.


A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant
About 1-cm in size small remnant mucosal polypoid lesions were seen at the inner anus on follow-up endoscopy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383624&req=5

Figure 6: About 1-cm in size small remnant mucosal polypoid lesions were seen at the inner anus on follow-up endoscopy.
Mentions: After surgical treatment, he did not have hematochezia for 5 months. Afterwards, he experienced recurrent bloody and mucoid stools. Colonoscopy revealed very small polypoid lesions at the previous location (Fig. 6). The lesions were too small to be removed through surgery. After mesalazine enema was administered, his clinical symptoms improved, and he no longer had bloody stools. At two months after recurrence, endoscopy showed that the size of polyps had decreased. Daily mesalazine enema was continued for 6 months prior to its discontinuation. The patient did not have any relapse for more than 12 months thereafter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, multilobulated, circumferential, polypoid lesions with mucoid discharge from the rectum. He was diagnosed with cap polyposis by endoscopy and histologic examination. He was treated with surgical resection, and was closely followed up. In the relevant literature, there is no report of cap polyposis in an infant. We report the first case of cap polyposis in the youngest infant.

No MeSH data available.