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A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant

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ABSTRACT

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, multilobulated, circumferential, polypoid lesions with mucoid discharge from the rectum. He was diagnosed with cap polyposis by endoscopy and histologic examination. He was treated with surgical resection, and was closely followed up. In the relevant literature, there is no report of cap polyposis in an infant. We report the first case of cap polyposis in the youngest infant.

No MeSH data available.


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Hyperplastic crypts covered with calcified granulation tissue were revealed on histologic examination (H & E, ×100).H & E = hematoxylin and eosin.
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Figure 5: Hyperplastic crypts covered with calcified granulation tissue were revealed on histologic examination (H & E, ×100).H & E = hematoxylin and eosin.

Mentions: Further evaluation with barium enema study showed several polypoid lesions without stalks in the anus (Fig. 3). A barium swallow study revealed normality of the stomach or the small bowel. Anorectal manometry showed normal pressure within the rectum and anus. The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was normal. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were performed under anesthesia. Colonoscopy revealed variously sized polypoid lesions without stalks in the anus (Fig. 4). Histological findings revealed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and multiple polyps with hyperplastic crypts covered with granulation tissue, and showing dystrophic calcification (Fig. 5). Normal mucosa was noted on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. He had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the Campylobacter-like organism test (CLO test), a serologic antibody test. The polypoid lesions were removed through transanal polypectomy. Three multilobulated polyps were located 1 cm above the anal verge at the 7 o'clock position, 3 cm above the anal verge at the 5 o'clock position, and 3.5 cm above the anal verge at the 4 o'clock position, respectively. Under general anesthesia, these polyps were completely removed by electrical cauterization using the Bovie cautery.


A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant
Hyperplastic crypts covered with calcified granulation tissue were revealed on histologic examination (H & E, ×100).H & E = hematoxylin and eosin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383624&req=5

Figure 5: Hyperplastic crypts covered with calcified granulation tissue were revealed on histologic examination (H & E, ×100).H & E = hematoxylin and eosin.
Mentions: Further evaluation with barium enema study showed several polypoid lesions without stalks in the anus (Fig. 3). A barium swallow study revealed normality of the stomach or the small bowel. Anorectal manometry showed normal pressure within the rectum and anus. The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was normal. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were performed under anesthesia. Colonoscopy revealed variously sized polypoid lesions without stalks in the anus (Fig. 4). Histological findings revealed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and multiple polyps with hyperplastic crypts covered with granulation tissue, and showing dystrophic calcification (Fig. 5). Normal mucosa was noted on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. He had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the Campylobacter-like organism test (CLO test), a serologic antibody test. The polypoid lesions were removed through transanal polypectomy. Three multilobulated polyps were located 1 cm above the anal verge at the 7 o'clock position, 3 cm above the anal verge at the 5 o'clock position, and 3.5 cm above the anal verge at the 4 o'clock position, respectively. Under general anesthesia, these polyps were completely removed by electrical cauterization using the Bovie cautery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, multilobulated, circumferential, polypoid lesions with mucoid discharge from the rectum. He was diagnosed with cap polyposis by endoscopy and histologic examination. He was treated with surgical resection, and was closely followed up. In the relevant literature, there is no report of cap polyposis in an infant. We report the first case of cap polyposis in the youngest infant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus