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A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant

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ABSTRACT

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, multilobulated, circumferential, polypoid lesions with mucoid discharge from the rectum. He was diagnosed with cap polyposis by endoscopy and histologic examination. He was treated with surgical resection, and was closely followed up. In the relevant literature, there is no report of cap polyposis in an infant. We report the first case of cap polyposis in the youngest infant.

No MeSH data available.


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CT image shows well-enhanced, multiple polypoid lesions about 1 cm in size located at 5 cm above the anal verge. Multiple lymph node enlargement was noted.CT = computed tomography.
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Figure 2: CT image shows well-enhanced, multiple polypoid lesions about 1 cm in size located at 5 cm above the anal verge. Multiple lymph node enlargement was noted.CT = computed tomography.

Mentions: He did not have any symptoms such as constipation or diarrhea. Also, his growth was normal. Laboratory test results were as follows: hemoglobin, 12.7 g/dL; hematocrit, 37.6%; platelets, 227,000/μL; protein, 6.8 g/dL; albumin, 4.7 g/dL. The serum levels of tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), α-fetoprotein (AFP), and CA 19-9 were within the normal range. His thyroid function test was normal. Plain radiographs of the abdomen and the chest showed normal findings. In the abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scan, well-enhanced multiple polypoid lesions, each about 1 cm in size, were seen at 4 to 6 cm above the anal verge. Enlargement of regional lymph nodes and lymph nodes of both iliac chain areas was noted. CT images suggested the possibility of rectal cancer (T3, N1) with metastasis (Fig. 2). However, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed normal findings. Hence, we concluded that he did not have metastatic malignancy or neuroanatomical abnormality.


A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant
CT image shows well-enhanced, multiple polypoid lesions about 1 cm in size located at 5 cm above the anal verge. Multiple lymph node enlargement was noted.CT = computed tomography.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383624&req=5

Figure 2: CT image shows well-enhanced, multiple polypoid lesions about 1 cm in size located at 5 cm above the anal verge. Multiple lymph node enlargement was noted.CT = computed tomography.
Mentions: He did not have any symptoms such as constipation or diarrhea. Also, his growth was normal. Laboratory test results were as follows: hemoglobin, 12.7 g/dL; hematocrit, 37.6%; platelets, 227,000/μL; protein, 6.8 g/dL; albumin, 4.7 g/dL. The serum levels of tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), α-fetoprotein (AFP), and CA 19-9 were within the normal range. His thyroid function test was normal. Plain radiographs of the abdomen and the chest showed normal findings. In the abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scan, well-enhanced multiple polypoid lesions, each about 1 cm in size, were seen at 4 to 6 cm above the anal verge. Enlargement of regional lymph nodes and lymph nodes of both iliac chain areas was noted. CT images suggested the possibility of rectal cancer (T3, N1) with metastasis (Fig. 2). However, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed normal findings. Hence, we concluded that he did not have metastatic malignancy or neuroanatomical abnormality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, multilobulated, circumferential, polypoid lesions with mucoid discharge from the rectum. He was diagnosed with cap polyposis by endoscopy and histologic examination. He was treated with surgical resection, and was closely followed up. In the relevant literature, there is no report of cap polyposis in an infant. We report the first case of cap polyposis in the youngest infant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus