Limits...
A Single Center Analysis of the Positivity of Hepatitis B Antibody after Neonatal Vaccination Program in Korea

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) seropositivity rate after 3 doses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination during infancy period is known to be higher than 90%. However, a considerable number of vaccines do not form protective anti-HBs or chronologic decrease of anti-HBs. We retrospectively collected data of HBV serologic test results in 20,738 individuals from 2000 to 2015. After exclusion criteria were applied, 19,072 individuals were included. We analyzed the anti-HBs seropositivity rate, anti-HBs disappearance rate, anti-HBs positive seroconversion rate after receiving a booster vaccine, and the difference in anti-HBs positivity between the 2 groups; group A (born before 2005, while both recombinant vaccines and plasma-derived vaccines were used) and group B (born after 2005, when only recombinant vaccines were used by national regulation). The anti-HBs seropositivity rate was 55.8%, but there was a significant difference in the rate of seropositivity for anti-HBs between the group A and B (53.0% vs. 78.1%, P < 0.001). There was no significant age-adjusted difference in the mean seropositivity rate between the 2 groups (P = 0.058). In addition, the anti-HBs positivity rate was significantly lower in the group A as compared with the group B during infancy (83.1% vs. 92.1%, P < 0.001). A total of 1,106 anti-HBs-positive subjects underwent serologic tests more than twice. Of these, 217 subjects (19.6%) showed anti-HBs disappearance. After booster vaccinations, 87.4% (83/95) achieved seroconversion from seronegative to seropositive. Our results highlight the importance of lifelong protection against HBV and the possible necessity of booster vaccination after adolescent period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The anti-HBs seropositivity rate depending on the age. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate reached the highest level (90.0%) at the age of < 12 months old. Until the age of 15 years old thereafter, however, it was decreased and then reached the lowest level of 43.5%. Since the age of 16 years old, however, it was gradually increased.Anti-HBs = antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383614&req=5

Figure 1: The anti-HBs seropositivity rate depending on the age. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate reached the highest level (90.0%) at the age of < 12 months old. Until the age of 15 years old thereafter, however, it was decreased and then reached the lowest level of 43.5%. Since the age of 16 years old, however, it was gradually increased.Anti-HBs = antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen.

Mentions: We calculated the overall anti-HBs seropositivity rate and provided its distribution using a range of 0–27. This showed that 10,641 and 8,431 subjects had a seropositivity and a seronegativity for anti-HBs, respectively. Thus, 55.8% of total subjects had a seropositivity for anti-HBs; it was 53.0% (8,957/16,915) in the group A and 78.1% (1,684/2,157) in the group B. This difference reached statistical significance (P < 0.001). The anti-HBs seropositivity rate reached the highest level (90.0%) at the age of < 12 months old. Until the age of 15 years old thereafter, however, it was decreased and then reached the lowest level of 43.5%. Since the age of 16 years old, however, it was gradually increased (Fig. 1).


A Single Center Analysis of the Positivity of Hepatitis B Antibody after Neonatal Vaccination Program in Korea
The anti-HBs seropositivity rate depending on the age. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate reached the highest level (90.0%) at the age of < 12 months old. Until the age of 15 years old thereafter, however, it was decreased and then reached the lowest level of 43.5%. Since the age of 16 years old, however, it was gradually increased.Anti-HBs = antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383614&req=5

Figure 1: The anti-HBs seropositivity rate depending on the age. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate reached the highest level (90.0%) at the age of < 12 months old. Until the age of 15 years old thereafter, however, it was decreased and then reached the lowest level of 43.5%. Since the age of 16 years old, however, it was gradually increased.Anti-HBs = antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen.
Mentions: We calculated the overall anti-HBs seropositivity rate and provided its distribution using a range of 0–27. This showed that 10,641 and 8,431 subjects had a seropositivity and a seronegativity for anti-HBs, respectively. Thus, 55.8% of total subjects had a seropositivity for anti-HBs; it was 53.0% (8,957/16,915) in the group A and 78.1% (1,684/2,157) in the group B. This difference reached statistical significance (P < 0.001). The anti-HBs seropositivity rate reached the highest level (90.0%) at the age of < 12 months old. Until the age of 15 years old thereafter, however, it was decreased and then reached the lowest level of 43.5%. Since the age of 16 years old, however, it was gradually increased (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) seropositivity rate after 3 doses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination during infancy period is known to be higher than 90%. However, a considerable number of vaccines do not form protective anti-HBs or chronologic decrease of anti-HBs. We retrospectively collected data of HBV serologic test results in 20,738 individuals from 2000 to 2015. After exclusion criteria were applied, 19,072 individuals were included. We analyzed the anti-HBs seropositivity rate, anti-HBs disappearance rate, anti-HBs positive seroconversion rate after receiving a booster vaccine, and the difference in anti-HBs positivity between the 2 groups; group A (born before 2005, while both recombinant vaccines and plasma-derived vaccines were used) and group B (born after 2005, when only recombinant vaccines were used by national regulation). The anti-HBs seropositivity rate was 55.8%, but there was a significant difference in the rate of seropositivity for anti-HBs between the group A and B (53.0% vs. 78.1%, P &lt; 0.001). There was no significant age-adjusted difference in the mean seropositivity rate between the 2 groups (P = 0.058). In addition, the anti-HBs positivity rate was significantly lower in the group A as compared with the group B during infancy (83.1% vs. 92.1%, P &lt; 0.001). A total of 1,106 anti-HBs-positive subjects underwent serologic tests more than twice. Of these, 217 subjects (19.6%) showed anti-HBs disappearance. After booster vaccinations, 87.4% (83/95) achieved seroconversion from seronegative to seropositive. Our results highlight the importance of lifelong protection against HBV and the possible necessity of booster vaccination after adolescent period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus