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Manuscript Submission Invitations from ‘ Predatory Journals ’ : What Should Authors Do?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Press freedom and worldwide internet access have opened ample opportunity for a staggering number of poor open access journals and junk publishers to emerge. Dubious publishers are abusing and camouflaging the golden open access model. In 2012, Jeffery Beall shed light on the predatory journals (as he preferred to call them) and the threat to open access scientific publication. Publishing in predatory journals is continuing to be a major threat for the development of science in developing countries. The authors of this article proposed solutions and outline a fresh perspective to help authors avoid publishing in predatory journals.

No MeSH data available.


Predatory journals. (The image file was organized from multiple sources in the web. Sources are here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_review, http://www.freeimages.com/premium/question-mark-1409031)
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Figure 1: Predatory journals. (The image file was organized from multiple sources in the web. Sources are here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_review, http://www.freeimages.com/premium/question-mark-1409031)

Mentions: In developing countries, where institutions and libraries cannot afford the subscription fees to access journal articles, open access is the best model to reach those who cannot afford to access relevant scientific publications (234). Motivated by press freedom, global internet and financial gains, predatory journals have emerged to corrupt open access. Everyone working in science daily receives emails of article submission invitations from “journals” and “publishers”. They request manuscript processing fees which mainly guarantees the acceptance of manuscripts without adequate scientific review (56). They request payments from those who cannot even afford to publish manuscripts (57). Predatory journals and publishers are those having minimal or nonexistent peer review, allowing weak scientific content to be published in the name of authentic science (5) (Fig. 1). The number of these predatory journals is ever increasing. The 2016 Jeffrey Beall list shows that 923 publishers, 882 standalone journals and 101 hijacked journals are registered as predatory (8).


Manuscript Submission Invitations from ‘ Predatory Journals ’ : What Should Authors Do?
Predatory journals. (The image file was organized from multiple sources in the web. Sources are here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_review, http://www.freeimages.com/premium/question-mark-1409031)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383600&req=5

Figure 1: Predatory journals. (The image file was organized from multiple sources in the web. Sources are here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_review, http://www.freeimages.com/premium/question-mark-1409031)
Mentions: In developing countries, where institutions and libraries cannot afford the subscription fees to access journal articles, open access is the best model to reach those who cannot afford to access relevant scientific publications (234). Motivated by press freedom, global internet and financial gains, predatory journals have emerged to corrupt open access. Everyone working in science daily receives emails of article submission invitations from “journals” and “publishers”. They request manuscript processing fees which mainly guarantees the acceptance of manuscripts without adequate scientific review (56). They request payments from those who cannot even afford to publish manuscripts (57). Predatory journals and publishers are those having minimal or nonexistent peer review, allowing weak scientific content to be published in the name of authentic science (5) (Fig. 1). The number of these predatory journals is ever increasing. The 2016 Jeffrey Beall list shows that 923 publishers, 882 standalone journals and 101 hijacked journals are registered as predatory (8).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Press freedom and worldwide internet access have opened ample opportunity for a staggering number of poor open access journals and junk publishers to emerge. Dubious publishers are abusing and camouflaging the golden open access model. In 2012, Jeffery Beall shed light on the predatory journals (as he preferred to call them) and the threat to open access scientific publication. Publishing in predatory journals is continuing to be a major threat for the development of science in developing countries. The authors of this article proposed solutions and outline a fresh perspective to help authors avoid publishing in predatory journals.

No MeSH data available.