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Applying occupational and organizational psychology theory to entrustment decision-making about trainees in health care: a   conceptual model

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ABSTRACT

In medical contexts around the world, supervising physicians continuously decide what degree of supervision to apply as trainees carry out professional activities. Although the implications for patients can be far-reaching, little is known about how these entrustment decisions are formed. The concept of ‘Entrustable Professional Activities’ has initiated interest and valuable research on factors that may influence the entrustment decision process.

The aim of the current article is to link models of entrustment developed in the fields of occupational and organizational psychology and military psychology to medical education studies that have explored the factors influencing physicians’ entrustment decisions. We provide a conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process, which we suggest will contribute to the understanding of how supervising physicians arrive at the decision to entrust a medical trainee with a professional activity.

No MeSH data available.


Conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process
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Fig2: Conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process

Mentions: Four categories of factors have been identified in a range of studies to influence entrustment decision-making: trainee characteristics, supervisor characteristics, characteristics of the task at hand and contextual factors [23–25, 36]. In addition, the relationship between the supervisor and the trainee has been identified as an important category [6, 27]. These studies provide a long list of factors in each category, summarized in an overview table by ten Cate et al. [2]. Fig. 2 illustrates how the findings of ten Cate et al. may be integrated with the trust models developed by Mayer et al. [28] and Cianciolo et al. [29] in a unified conceptual model of the entrustment decision-making process.Fig. 2


Applying occupational and organizational psychology theory to entrustment decision-making about trainees in health care: a   conceptual model
Conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383570&req=5

Fig2: Conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process
Mentions: Four categories of factors have been identified in a range of studies to influence entrustment decision-making: trainee characteristics, supervisor characteristics, characteristics of the task at hand and contextual factors [23–25, 36]. In addition, the relationship between the supervisor and the trainee has been identified as an important category [6, 27]. These studies provide a long list of factors in each category, summarized in an overview table by ten Cate et al. [2]. Fig. 2 illustrates how the findings of ten Cate et al. may be integrated with the trust models developed by Mayer et al. [28] and Cianciolo et al. [29] in a unified conceptual model of the entrustment decision-making process.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In medical contexts around the world, supervising physicians continuously decide what degree of supervision to apply as trainees carry out professional activities. Although the implications for patients can be far-reaching, little is known about how these entrustment decisions are formed. The concept of ‘Entrustable Professional Activities’ has initiated interest and valuable research on factors that may influence the entrustment decision process.

The aim of the current article is to link models of entrustment developed in the fields of occupational and organizational psychology and military psychology to medical education studies that have explored the factors influencing physicians’ entrustment decisions. We provide a conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process, which we suggest will contribute to the understanding of how supervising physicians arrive at the decision to entrust a medical trainee with a professional activity.

No MeSH data available.