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The trade ‐ off between fecundity and egg size in a polymorphic population of Arctic charr ( Salvelinus alpinus (L.)) in Skogsfjordvatn, subarctic Norway

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ABSTRACT

Reproductive traits differ between intralacustrine Arctic charr morphs. Here, we examine three sympatric lacustrine Arctic charr morphs with respect to fecundity, egg size and spawning time/site to assess reproductive investments and trade‐offs, and possible fitness consequences. The littoral omnivore morph (LO‐morph) utilizes the upper water for feeding and reproduction and spawn early in October. The large profundal piscivore morph (PP‐morph) and the small profundal benthivore morph (PB‐morph) utilize the profundal habitat for feeding and reproduction and spawn in December and November, respectively. Females from all morphs were sampled for fecundity and egg‐size analysis. There were large differences between the morphs. The PB‐morph had the lowest fecundity (mean = 45, SD = 13) and smallest egg size (mean = 3.2 mm, SD = 0.32 mm). In contrast, the PP‐morph had the highest fecundity (mean = 859.5, SD = 462) and the largest egg size (mean = 4.5 mm, SD = 0.46 mm), whereas the LO‐morph had intermediate fecundity (mean = 580, SD = 225) and egg size (mean = 4.3, SD = 0.24 mm). Fecundity increased with increasing body size within each morph. This was not the case for egg size, which was independent of body sizes within morph. Different adaptations to feeding and habitat utilization have apparently led to a difference in the trade‐off between fecundity and egg size among the three different morphs.

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Relationship between body weight (g) and fecundity for the three different Arctic charr morphs in Skogsfjordvatn on a log‐log scale. The regression lines explain the main effect of body weight and morph on fecundity; in addition, there is an interaction effect of egg size on the slope for all three morphs
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ece32669-fig-0002: Relationship between body weight (g) and fecundity for the three different Arctic charr morphs in Skogsfjordvatn on a log‐log scale. The regression lines explain the main effect of body weight and morph on fecundity; in addition, there is an interaction effect of egg size on the slope for all three morphs

Mentions: Mean fecundity was significantly different between the three morphs (ANOVA: F‐value (2,39) = 36.037, p < .0001). A post hoc test (Tukey HSD) revealed a significant difference in mean fecundity (q‐value (2, 39) = 3.445) between the PB‐ and LO‐morph (p < .0001), between the PB‐ and PP‐morph (p < .001), and between the LO‐ and PP‐morph (p = .045). The PB‐morph had the lowest observed fecundity and the PP‐morph had the highest, whereas the exact opposite was evident for relative fecundity, where the PB‐morph had the highest and the PP‐morph had the lowest values (Table 3). Log‐log‐transformed regression analyses (F‐statistic (2, 39) = 1174, adjusted R2 = 0.983, p < .0001) revealed a significant increase in fecundity with increasing body weight (t‐value (2, 39) = 10.859, p < .0001), and in addition, there was an interaction effect of egg size (t‐value (2, 39) = −2.168, p = .0363) on the slope with a relative increase in fecundity with decreasing egg size (Figure 2).


The trade ‐ off between fecundity and egg size in a polymorphic population of Arctic charr ( Salvelinus alpinus (L.)) in Skogsfjordvatn, subarctic Norway
Relationship between body weight (g) and fecundity for the three different Arctic charr morphs in Skogsfjordvatn on a log‐log scale. The regression lines explain the main effect of body weight and morph on fecundity; in addition, there is an interaction effect of egg size on the slope for all three morphs
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383491&req=5

ece32669-fig-0002: Relationship between body weight (g) and fecundity for the three different Arctic charr morphs in Skogsfjordvatn on a log‐log scale. The regression lines explain the main effect of body weight and morph on fecundity; in addition, there is an interaction effect of egg size on the slope for all three morphs
Mentions: Mean fecundity was significantly different between the three morphs (ANOVA: F‐value (2,39) = 36.037, p < .0001). A post hoc test (Tukey HSD) revealed a significant difference in mean fecundity (q‐value (2, 39) = 3.445) between the PB‐ and LO‐morph (p < .0001), between the PB‐ and PP‐morph (p < .001), and between the LO‐ and PP‐morph (p = .045). The PB‐morph had the lowest observed fecundity and the PP‐morph had the highest, whereas the exact opposite was evident for relative fecundity, where the PB‐morph had the highest and the PP‐morph had the lowest values (Table 3). Log‐log‐transformed regression analyses (F‐statistic (2, 39) = 1174, adjusted R2 = 0.983, p < .0001) revealed a significant increase in fecundity with increasing body weight (t‐value (2, 39) = 10.859, p < .0001), and in addition, there was an interaction effect of egg size (t‐value (2, 39) = −2.168, p = .0363) on the slope with a relative increase in fecundity with decreasing egg size (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Reproductive traits differ between intralacustrine Arctic charr morphs. Here, we examine three sympatric lacustrine Arctic charr morphs with respect to fecundity, egg size and spawning time/site to assess reproductive investments and trade&#8208;offs, and possible fitness consequences. The littoral omnivore morph (LO&#8208;morph) utilizes the upper water for feeding and reproduction and spawn early in October. The large profundal piscivore morph (PP&#8208;morph) and the small profundal benthivore morph (PB&#8208;morph) utilize the profundal habitat for feeding and reproduction and spawn in December and November, respectively. Females from all morphs were sampled for fecundity and egg&#8208;size analysis. There were large differences between the morphs. The PB&#8208;morph had the lowest fecundity (mean&nbsp;=&nbsp;45, SD&nbsp;=&nbsp;13) and smallest egg size (mean&nbsp;=&nbsp;3.2&nbsp;mm, SD&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.32&nbsp;mm). In contrast, the PP&#8208;morph had the highest fecundity (mean&nbsp;=&nbsp;859.5, SD&nbsp;=&nbsp;462) and the largest egg size (mean&nbsp;=&nbsp;4.5&nbsp;mm, SD&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.46&nbsp;mm), whereas the LO&#8208;morph had intermediate fecundity (mean&nbsp;=&nbsp;580, SD&nbsp;=&nbsp;225) and egg size (mean&nbsp;=&nbsp;4.3, SD&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.24&nbsp;mm). Fecundity increased with increasing body size within each morph. This was not the case for egg size, which was independent of body sizes within morph. Different adaptations to feeding and habitat utilization have apparently led to a difference in the trade&#8208;off between fecundity and egg size among the three different morphs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus