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Reproductive interference by male Drosophila subobscura on female D.   persimilis : A laboratory experiment

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

While females often reject courtship attempts by heterospecific males, reproductive interference by harassment from such males can nonetheless occur, potentially reducing female fitness. Such effects may be profound following a range expansion, when males from a new species may suddenly encounter (and perhaps even become abundant relative to) females of related native species. Drosophila subobscura recently invaded North America and may impact native species through reproductive interference and other processes. We test for the potential for reproductive interference by D. subobscura males on D. persimilis females in the laboratory. D. subobscura males aggressively copulated with D. persimilis females, including many females that exhibit rejection behaviors. Despite females attempting to dismount the males, the heterospecific copulations are on average longer than conspecific copulations, and females exhibit some reluctance to remate with conspecific males following this harassment. Females confined with both conspecific and heterospecific males produce fewer adult progeny than those with either conspecific males only or with conspecific males and distantly related D. simulans males that do not engage in female harassment. Overall, our results illustrate how reproductive interference by an invasive species can have negative effects on resident natural populations.

No MeSH data available.


Boxplot of number of progeny collected per vial from the D. persimilis control (D. persimilis males and females), the D. persimilis + D. simulans control (D. persimilis males and females with D. simulans males), and the D. persimilis + D. subobscura experimental treatment (D. persimilis males and females with D. subobscura males)
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ece32855-fig-0002: Boxplot of number of progeny collected per vial from the D. persimilis control (D. persimilis males and females), the D. persimilis + D. simulans control (D. persimilis males and females with D. simulans males), and the D. persimilis + D. subobscura experimental treatment (D. persimilis males and females with D. subobscura males)

Mentions: We counted adult progeny from daily replicates from each of the D. persimilis control, the D. persimilis + D. subobscura experimental treatment, and the D. persimilis + D. simulans density control. The experimental treatment produced fewer offspring on average (median 120 progeny) than either the D. persimilis control (median 166 progeny, Wilcoxon signed‐rank test, W = 717, N = 47, p = .0002) or the D. persimilis + D. simulans density control (median 139 progeny, Wilcoxon signed‐rank test, W = 321, N = 43, p = .045, see Figure 2). The presence of D. subobscura males appears to have a negative effect on the number of adult progeny produced by D. persimilis females in captivity.


Reproductive interference by male Drosophila subobscura on female D.   persimilis : A laboratory experiment
Boxplot of number of progeny collected per vial from the D. persimilis control (D. persimilis males and females), the D. persimilis + D. simulans control (D. persimilis males and females with D. simulans males), and the D. persimilis + D. subobscura experimental treatment (D. persimilis males and females with D. subobscura males)
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383474&req=5

ece32855-fig-0002: Boxplot of number of progeny collected per vial from the D. persimilis control (D. persimilis males and females), the D. persimilis + D. simulans control (D. persimilis males and females with D. simulans males), and the D. persimilis + D. subobscura experimental treatment (D. persimilis males and females with D. subobscura males)
Mentions: We counted adult progeny from daily replicates from each of the D. persimilis control, the D. persimilis + D. subobscura experimental treatment, and the D. persimilis + D. simulans density control. The experimental treatment produced fewer offspring on average (median 120 progeny) than either the D. persimilis control (median 166 progeny, Wilcoxon signed‐rank test, W = 717, N = 47, p = .0002) or the D. persimilis + D. simulans density control (median 139 progeny, Wilcoxon signed‐rank test, W = 321, N = 43, p = .045, see Figure 2). The presence of D. subobscura males appears to have a negative effect on the number of adult progeny produced by D. persimilis females in captivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

While females often reject courtship attempts by heterospecific males, reproductive interference by harassment from such males can nonetheless occur, potentially reducing female fitness. Such effects may be profound following a range expansion, when males from a new species may suddenly encounter (and perhaps even become abundant relative to) females of related native species. Drosophila subobscura recently invaded North America and may impact native species through reproductive interference and other processes. We test for the potential for reproductive interference by D. subobscura males on D. persimilis females in the laboratory. D. subobscura males aggressively copulated with D. persimilis females, including many females that exhibit rejection behaviors. Despite females attempting to dismount the males, the heterospecific copulations are on average longer than conspecific copulations, and females exhibit some reluctance to remate with conspecific males following this harassment. Females confined with both conspecific and heterospecific males produce fewer adult progeny than those with either conspecific males only or with conspecific males and distantly related D. simulans males that do not engage in female harassment. Overall, our results illustrate how reproductive interference by an invasive species can have negative effects on resident natural populations.

No MeSH data available.