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Efficacy of an eye drop mixture for pupillary dilatation: A randomized comparative study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Pupillary dilatation with three types of eye drops is used regularly in the clinic; however, a mixture of these drops in a single bottle may be more beneficial in reducing workloads and resources. This study compared the efficacy in pupillary dilatation between two protocols of dilating drop instillation.

Methods: This prospective, randomized, comparative study included 30 eligible Thai patients. The patients randomly received preoperative pupillary dilatations by either the conventional protocol (1% tropicamide (T), 10% phenylephrine (P) and 0.1% diclofenac (D) in three separate bottles) or the fixed combination (TPD) protocol which had the three types of eye drops mixed in a single bottle in a ratio of 4:3:3. The chi-square test and independent t-test were used to analyze the data.

Results: The conventional protocol group and TPD protocol group each had 15 patients. Sixty minutes after the initial instillation, all patients in the TPD protocol and 13 patients (86.7%) in conventional protocol achieved at least 6 mm in the shortest diameter. The mydriatic rate between protocols showed no difference. In patients who received the TPD protocol, the systemic effects on the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased over time.

Conclusion: The mixture of tropicamide, phenylephrine and diclofenac had a comparable efficacy for a pupillary dilatation to the conventional dilating drops in separate bottles. The systemic complications on blood pressure and arterial pulse of the TPD mixture were less than the conventional protocol.

Trial registration: TCTR20130325001.

No MeSH data available.


Pupillary diameter at each time point.
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fig0005: Pupillary diameter at each time point.

Mentions: At baseline, the mean pupillary size of the patients in the TPD group was slightly larger than the conventional group. However, the average difference in the final pupillary size from baseline in both groups was equal. The pupil diameter increased by 4.12 ± 1.06 mm in the TPD group and by 4.10 ± 0.80 mm in the conventional group (Table 3). The average rate of mydriasis in the TPD group was 0.0687 mm/min and 0.0683 mm/min in the conventional group. There was no statistical difference of mydriatic rates between the two protocols (Fig. 1). All patients in the TPD group and 13 patients (86.7%) in the conventional group achieved their target pupillary size at 60 min. Changes in the pupil diameter from baseline were not significantly different between protocols (Table 3). These changes also showed no differences between normal patients and patients with underlying diseases at every time point in the subgroup analyses of both protocols (Table 4).


Efficacy of an eye drop mixture for pupillary dilatation: A randomized comparative study
Pupillary diameter at each time point.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383462&req=5

fig0005: Pupillary diameter at each time point.
Mentions: At baseline, the mean pupillary size of the patients in the TPD group was slightly larger than the conventional group. However, the average difference in the final pupillary size from baseline in both groups was equal. The pupil diameter increased by 4.12 ± 1.06 mm in the TPD group and by 4.10 ± 0.80 mm in the conventional group (Table 3). The average rate of mydriasis in the TPD group was 0.0687 mm/min and 0.0683 mm/min in the conventional group. There was no statistical difference of mydriatic rates between the two protocols (Fig. 1). All patients in the TPD group and 13 patients (86.7%) in the conventional group achieved their target pupillary size at 60 min. Changes in the pupil diameter from baseline were not significantly different between protocols (Table 3). These changes also showed no differences between normal patients and patients with underlying diseases at every time point in the subgroup analyses of both protocols (Table 4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Pupillary dilatation with three types of eye drops is used regularly in the clinic; however, a mixture of these drops in a single bottle may be more beneficial in reducing workloads and resources. This study compared the efficacy in pupillary dilatation between two protocols of dilating drop instillation.

Methods: This prospective, randomized, comparative study included 30 eligible Thai patients. The patients randomly received preoperative pupillary dilatations by either the conventional protocol (1% tropicamide (T), 10% phenylephrine (P) and 0.1% diclofenac (D) in three separate bottles) or the fixed combination (TPD) protocol which had the three types of eye drops mixed in a single bottle in a ratio of 4:3:3. The chi-square test and independent t-test were used to analyze the data.

Results: The conventional protocol group and TPD protocol group each had 15 patients. Sixty minutes after the initial instillation, all patients in the TPD protocol and 13 patients (86.7%) in conventional protocol achieved at least 6 mm in the shortest diameter. The mydriatic rate between protocols showed no difference. In patients who received the TPD protocol, the systemic effects on the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased over time.

Conclusion: The mixture of tropicamide, phenylephrine and diclofenac had a comparable efficacy for a pupillary dilatation to the conventional dilating drops in separate bottles. The systemic complications on blood pressure and arterial pulse of the TPD mixture were less than the conventional protocol.

Trial registration: TCTR20130325001.

No MeSH data available.