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Long-term results of MyoRing treatment of keratoconus ☆

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To study long-term results of MyoRing treatment of keratoconus.

Methods: Retrospective study of MyoRing implantation into a corneal pocket for keratoconus.

Results: Corneal thickness at the thinnest point remained unchanged, SIM K's, manifest sphere and cylinder were significantly improved at the first follow-up 9 months postoperatively and remained stable until the last follow-up about 5 years after surgery. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, CDVA) were significantly improved at the first follow-up 9 months postoperatively and were further ameliorated until the last follow-up about 5 years after surgery.

Conclusion: The treatment was safe and effective with continuing improvement of visual acuity during the 5 years after surgery.

No MeSH data available.


shows the tangential topographic map of 3 different postoperative states obtained with Pentacam (Oculus GmbH, Germany): (a) perfect result, (b) overcorrection and (c) undercorrection.
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fig0015: shows the tangential topographic map of 3 different postoperative states obtained with Pentacam (Oculus GmbH, Germany): (a) perfect result, (b) overcorrection and (c) undercorrection.

Mentions: The criteria for optimization, i.e. the need to change the implant for a “stronger” or “weaker” one, may differ depending on the following situations. If visual acuity (UDVA, CDVA) at the end of the postoperative observation period of three months is as preoperatively planned, no further intervention is needed and treatment is completed. In these cases, the refraction (spherical equivalent SE) is normally close to zero and the topography shows a certain characteristic pattern in the postoperative tangential map (Fig. 3a); the color-marked local corneal curvature has the shape of a “central island” and the ring-shaped topography of the MyoRing is of “homogeneous” intensity (local curvature). If visual acuity at the end of the postoperative observation period of three months does not match preoperative expectations, refraction and topography will have to play a role in further decision making. In the case of overcorrection, the refraction shows a hyperopic shift and the color-marked “intensity” of the concentric ring in the tangential map is most pronounced over the “central island” (Fig. 3b). In this case, the MyoRing has to be replaced by a “weaker” one. The opposite applies in the case of undercorrection. Here the spherical equivalent is usually in the myopic range, and the prominent feature in the tangential map is the “central island”, with the concentric ring pattern being clearly underrepresented (Fig. 3c). This is an indication to replace the implant by a “stronger” one. “Weaker” means that the implant has a larger diameter and/or is thinner, “stronger” means the opposite. The rationale of MyoRing treatment of keratoconus for achieving optimal results is somehow related to hard contact lens fitting. But instead of analyzing fluorescein patterns as in contact lens fitting, the MyoRing is optimally adjusted to match the tangential topography map.


Long-term results of MyoRing treatment of keratoconus ☆
shows the tangential topographic map of 3 different postoperative states obtained with Pentacam (Oculus GmbH, Germany): (a) perfect result, (b) overcorrection and (c) undercorrection.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383460&req=5

fig0015: shows the tangential topographic map of 3 different postoperative states obtained with Pentacam (Oculus GmbH, Germany): (a) perfect result, (b) overcorrection and (c) undercorrection.
Mentions: The criteria for optimization, i.e. the need to change the implant for a “stronger” or “weaker” one, may differ depending on the following situations. If visual acuity (UDVA, CDVA) at the end of the postoperative observation period of three months is as preoperatively planned, no further intervention is needed and treatment is completed. In these cases, the refraction (spherical equivalent SE) is normally close to zero and the topography shows a certain characteristic pattern in the postoperative tangential map (Fig. 3a); the color-marked local corneal curvature has the shape of a “central island” and the ring-shaped topography of the MyoRing is of “homogeneous” intensity (local curvature). If visual acuity at the end of the postoperative observation period of three months does not match preoperative expectations, refraction and topography will have to play a role in further decision making. In the case of overcorrection, the refraction shows a hyperopic shift and the color-marked “intensity” of the concentric ring in the tangential map is most pronounced over the “central island” (Fig. 3b). In this case, the MyoRing has to be replaced by a “weaker” one. The opposite applies in the case of undercorrection. Here the spherical equivalent is usually in the myopic range, and the prominent feature in the tangential map is the “central island”, with the concentric ring pattern being clearly underrepresented (Fig. 3c). This is an indication to replace the implant by a “stronger” one. “Weaker” means that the implant has a larger diameter and/or is thinner, “stronger” means the opposite. The rationale of MyoRing treatment of keratoconus for achieving optimal results is somehow related to hard contact lens fitting. But instead of analyzing fluorescein patterns as in contact lens fitting, the MyoRing is optimally adjusted to match the tangential topography map.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To study long-term results of MyoRing treatment of keratoconus.

Methods: Retrospective study of MyoRing implantation into a corneal pocket for keratoconus.

Results: Corneal thickness at the thinnest point remained unchanged, SIM K's, manifest sphere and cylinder were significantly improved at the first follow-up 9 months postoperatively and remained stable until the last follow-up about 5 years after surgery. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, CDVA) were significantly improved at the first follow-up 9 months postoperatively and were further ameliorated until the last follow-up about 5 years after surgery.

Conclusion: The treatment was safe and effective with continuing improvement of visual acuity during the 5 years after surgery.

No MeSH data available.