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Circumscribed choroidal hemangioma: A case report and literature review

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Choroidal hemangioma is a rare congenital ocular tumor that can present as either circumscribed or diffuse. Circumscribed choroidal hemangioma (CCH) typically manifests as a red-orange mass within the posterior pole and appears similar to other ocular conditions, such as choroidal melanoma and choroidal metastasis. Proper diagnosis is crucial and is aided by the use of ancillary testing. CCH itself is benign but can cause secondary complications such as subretinal fluid accumulation and subsequent retinal detachment. If these conditions should arise, several treatment options are available.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fundus photo shows a circumscribed choroidal hemangioma superior temporal to the optic nerve in the left eye.
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fig0005: Fundus photo shows a circumscribed choroidal hemangioma superior temporal to the optic nerve in the left eye.

Mentions: The patient's best-corrected visual acuities (BVA) were 20/20 OD and 20/100 OS, and he consistently missed letters on the left side of the chart with his left eye. Pupils were equal, round, and reactive to light OU, and there was no afferent pupillary defect. Confrontation fields were full, and extra-ocular muscles had full range of motion. Amsler grid was unremarkable OD and revealed left-sided metamorphopsia OS. Slit lamp examination was unremarkable OU, and intraocular pressures were within normal limits. Dilated fundus exam of the left eye (Fig. 1) revealed a 2DD orange-red elevated lesion superior temporal to the optic nerve head with overlying retinal pigment epithelium change and pigmentation. An associated 3–4 DD central serous retinal detachment was also noted. Several ancillary tests were performed. Ultrasonography showed a 2 mm × 8 mm solid choroidal mass on B-scan with high internal reflectivity on A-scan. OCT revealed a large choroidal mass with overlying subretinal fluid. Fundus photos were also taken.


Circumscribed choroidal hemangioma: A case report and literature review
Fundus photo shows a circumscribed choroidal hemangioma superior temporal to the optic nerve in the left eye.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383459&req=5

fig0005: Fundus photo shows a circumscribed choroidal hemangioma superior temporal to the optic nerve in the left eye.
Mentions: The patient's best-corrected visual acuities (BVA) were 20/20 OD and 20/100 OS, and he consistently missed letters on the left side of the chart with his left eye. Pupils were equal, round, and reactive to light OU, and there was no afferent pupillary defect. Confrontation fields were full, and extra-ocular muscles had full range of motion. Amsler grid was unremarkable OD and revealed left-sided metamorphopsia OS. Slit lamp examination was unremarkable OU, and intraocular pressures were within normal limits. Dilated fundus exam of the left eye (Fig. 1) revealed a 2DD orange-red elevated lesion superior temporal to the optic nerve head with overlying retinal pigment epithelium change and pigmentation. An associated 3–4 DD central serous retinal detachment was also noted. Several ancillary tests were performed. Ultrasonography showed a 2 mm × 8 mm solid choroidal mass on B-scan with high internal reflectivity on A-scan. OCT revealed a large choroidal mass with overlying subretinal fluid. Fundus photos were also taken.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Choroidal hemangioma is a rare congenital ocular tumor that can present as either circumscribed or diffuse. Circumscribed choroidal hemangioma (CCH) typically manifests as a red-orange mass within the posterior pole and appears similar to other ocular conditions, such as choroidal melanoma and choroidal metastasis. Proper diagnosis is crucial and is aided by the use of ancillary testing. CCH itself is benign but can cause secondary complications such as subretinal fluid accumulation and subsequent retinal detachment. If these conditions should arise, several treatment options are available.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus