Limits...
A systematic review of the quality of conduct and reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in paediatric surgery

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: Our objective was to evaluate quality of conduct and reporting of published systematic reviews and meta-analyses in paediatric surgery. We also aimed to identify characteristics predictive of review quality.

Background: Systematic reviews summarise evidence by combining sources, but are potentially prone to bias. To counter this, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was published to aid in reporting. Similarly, the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) measurement tool was designed to appraise methodology. The paediatric surgical literature has seen an increasing number of reviews over the past decade, but quality has not been evaluated.

Methods: Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review with a priori design to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of interventions in paediatric surgery. From 01/2010 to 06/2016, we searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Web of Science, Google Scholar, reference lists and journals. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data. We assessed conduct and reporting using AMSTAR and PRISMA. Scores were calculated as the sum of reported items. We also extracted author, journal and article characteristics, and used them in exploratory analysis to determine which variables predict quality.

Results: 112 articles fulfilled eligibility criteria (53 systematic reviews; 59 meta-analyses). Overall, 68% AMSTAR and 56.8% PRISMA items were reported adequately. Poorest scores were identified with regards a priori design, inclusion of structured summaries, including the grey literature, citing excluded articles and evaluating bias. 13 reviews were pre-registered and 6 in PRISMA-endorsing journals. The following predicted quality in univariate analysis:, word count, Cochrane review, journal h-index, impact factor, journal endorses PRISMA, PRISMA adherence suggested in author guidance, article mentions PRISMA, review includes comparison of interventions and review registration. The latter three variables were significant in multivariate regression.

Conclusions: There are gaps in the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews in paediatric surgery. More endorsement by journals of the PRISMA guideline may improve review quality, and the dissemination of reliable evidence to paediatric clinicians.

No MeSH data available.


PRISMA flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383307&req=5

pone.0175213.g001: PRISMA flow diagram.

Mentions: A systematic search of the English literature was performed on 10th June 2016 to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on paediatric surgical interventions published from 1st January 2010 to 10th June 2016. The former date was selected because the original PRISMA statement was published and disseminated in multiple medical and surgical journals in mid-2009. An initial electronic search was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The search strategy is shown in S1 Table and the PRISMA flow diagram in Fig 1. A similar search was performed of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (by searching all articles manually within the period studied under topics: Cancer, Child Health, Endocrine & Metabolic, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Kidney Disease, Methodology, Neonatal Care, Pregnancy & Childbirth, Urology and Wounds), Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database (similar to the search conducted in S1 Table), Thomson Reuters Web of Science (similar to the search conducted in S1 Table), and Google Scholar (searching for articles with “surgery”, “intervention” or “procedure” in the title and including either “paediatric”, “pediatric”, “neonatal”, “neonate”, “infant”, “child”, “children”, “adolescent” or “toddler”). The reference lists of included articles were also searched, in addition to hand-searching of various relevant high-impact journals (S2 Table).


A systematic review of the quality of conduct and reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in paediatric surgery
PRISMA flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383307&req=5

pone.0175213.g001: PRISMA flow diagram.
Mentions: A systematic search of the English literature was performed on 10th June 2016 to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on paediatric surgical interventions published from 1st January 2010 to 10th June 2016. The former date was selected because the original PRISMA statement was published and disseminated in multiple medical and surgical journals in mid-2009. An initial electronic search was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The search strategy is shown in S1 Table and the PRISMA flow diagram in Fig 1. A similar search was performed of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (by searching all articles manually within the period studied under topics: Cancer, Child Health, Endocrine & Metabolic, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Kidney Disease, Methodology, Neonatal Care, Pregnancy & Childbirth, Urology and Wounds), Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database (similar to the search conducted in S1 Table), Thomson Reuters Web of Science (similar to the search conducted in S1 Table), and Google Scholar (searching for articles with “surgery”, “intervention” or “procedure” in the title and including either “paediatric”, “pediatric”, “neonatal”, “neonate”, “infant”, “child”, “children”, “adolescent” or “toddler”). The reference lists of included articles were also searched, in addition to hand-searching of various relevant high-impact journals (S2 Table).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: Our objective was to evaluate quality of conduct and reporting of published systematic reviews and meta-analyses in paediatric surgery. We also aimed to identify characteristics predictive of review quality.

Background: Systematic reviews summarise evidence by combining sources, but are potentially prone to bias. To counter this, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was published to aid in reporting. Similarly, the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) measurement tool was designed to appraise methodology. The paediatric surgical literature has seen an increasing number of reviews over the past decade, but quality has not been evaluated.

Methods: Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review with a priori design to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of interventions in paediatric surgery. From 01/2010 to 06/2016, we searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Web of Science, Google Scholar, reference lists and journals. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data. We assessed conduct and reporting using AMSTAR and PRISMA. Scores were calculated as the sum of reported items. We also extracted author, journal and article characteristics, and used them in exploratory analysis to determine which variables predict quality.

Results: 112 articles fulfilled eligibility criteria (53 systematic reviews; 59 meta-analyses). Overall, 68% AMSTAR and 56.8% PRISMA items were reported adequately. Poorest scores were identified with regards a priori design, inclusion of structured summaries, including the grey literature, citing excluded articles and evaluating bias. 13 reviews were pre-registered and 6 in PRISMA-endorsing journals. The following predicted quality in univariate analysis:, word count, Cochrane review, journal h-index, impact factor, journal endorses PRISMA, PRISMA adherence suggested in author guidance, article mentions PRISMA, review includes comparison of interventions and review registration. The latter three variables were significant in multivariate regression.

Conclusions: There are gaps in the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews in paediatric surgery. More endorsement by journals of the PRISMA guideline may improve review quality, and the dissemination of reliable evidence to paediatric clinicians.

No MeSH data available.