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Effect of male mating history and age on remating by female European corn borer

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

If mating with an inferior male has high fitness costs, females may try to avoid mating with these males. Alternatively, females may accept an inferior male to ensure they have obtained at least one mate, and/or to avoid the costs of resisting these males. We hypothesized that females compensate for mating with an inferior male by remating. We tested this hypothesis by measuring remating propensity in females that had mated with an old, multiply-mated male, a 9-day-old virgin male, or a young, virgin male. Females were more likely to remate when they had mated with multiply-mated males than when they had mated with a 9-day-old or young virgin male. We discuss the observed mating behavior by females in terms of sexual selection for multiple mating.

No MeSH data available.


Average daily fecundity (± SE) for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a multiple mated male (MMM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a young virgin male (YVM), and then remated (R) or not (NR).Means with different letters are significantly different (Sidak Test, a = 0.05)
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pone.0175512.g005: Average daily fecundity (± SE) for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a multiple mated male (MMM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a young virgin male (YVM), and then remated (R) or not (NR).Means with different letters are significantly different (Sidak Test, a = 0.05)

Mentions: Among females that first mated with multiply-mated males, females that remated had higher fecundities than the ones that had no opportunity to remate (Fig 4). However, among females that first mated with old virgin males or young virgin males, remating had no influence on their fecundity (Wald χ2 = 1608; df = 5; P<0.0001) (Fig 4). Similarly, average daily fecundities varied with female mating history (Wald χ2 = 252.2; df = 5; P<0.0001). Females that mated first with a young virgin male and mated again had the highest daily fecundity (Fig 5). In addition, we found no evidence for a trade-off between fecundity and longevity associated with female mating history. The slopes of fecundity versus longevity were not different among or within any of the female mating histories (interaction effect, F5, 146 = 1.28; P = 0.276), although, as expected, average fecundity increased with increasing female longevity (main effect, F1,146 = 29.37; P<0.0001).


Effect of male mating history and age on remating by female European corn borer
Average daily fecundity (± SE) for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a multiple mated male (MMM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a young virgin male (YVM), and then remated (R) or not (NR).Means with different letters are significantly different (Sidak Test, a = 0.05)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383304&req=5

pone.0175512.g005: Average daily fecundity (± SE) for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a multiple mated male (MMM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a young virgin male (YVM), and then remated (R) or not (NR).Means with different letters are significantly different (Sidak Test, a = 0.05)
Mentions: Among females that first mated with multiply-mated males, females that remated had higher fecundities than the ones that had no opportunity to remate (Fig 4). However, among females that first mated with old virgin males or young virgin males, remating had no influence on their fecundity (Wald χ2 = 1608; df = 5; P<0.0001) (Fig 4). Similarly, average daily fecundities varied with female mating history (Wald χ2 = 252.2; df = 5; P<0.0001). Females that mated first with a young virgin male and mated again had the highest daily fecundity (Fig 5). In addition, we found no evidence for a trade-off between fecundity and longevity associated with female mating history. The slopes of fecundity versus longevity were not different among or within any of the female mating histories (interaction effect, F5, 146 = 1.28; P = 0.276), although, as expected, average fecundity increased with increasing female longevity (main effect, F1,146 = 29.37; P<0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

If mating with an inferior male has high fitness costs, females may try to avoid mating with these males. Alternatively, females may accept an inferior male to ensure they have obtained at least one mate, and/or to avoid the costs of resisting these males. We hypothesized that females compensate for mating with an inferior male by remating. We tested this hypothesis by measuring remating propensity in females that had mated with an old, multiply-mated male, a 9-day-old virgin male, or a young, virgin male. Females were more likely to remate when they had mated with multiply-mated males than when they had mated with a 9-day-old or young virgin male. We discuss the observed mating behavior by females in terms of sexual selection for multiple mating.

No MeSH data available.