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Effect of male mating history and age on remating by female European corn borer

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

If mating with an inferior male has high fitness costs, females may try to avoid mating with these males. Alternatively, females may accept an inferior male to ensure they have obtained at least one mate, and/or to avoid the costs of resisting these males. We hypothesized that females compensate for mating with an inferior male by remating. We tested this hypothesis by measuring remating propensity in females that had mated with an old, multiply-mated male, a 9-day-old virgin male, or a young, virgin male. Females were more likely to remate when they had mated with multiply-mated males than when they had mated with a 9-day-old or young virgin male. We discuss the observed mating behavior by females in terms of sexual selection for multiple mating.

No MeSH data available.


Fitted parameters for Weibull hazard function for the time to remating for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a young virgin male (YVM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a multiple mated male (MMM).The lines enclose 95% confidence regions for the joint parameter estimates.
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pone.0175512.g002: Fitted parameters for Weibull hazard function for the time to remating for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a young virgin male (YVM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a multiple mated male (MMM).The lines enclose 95% confidence regions for the joint parameter estimates.

Mentions: The period of time to remating was significantly different among the three groups (Fig 2). Females that mated with a multiply-mated male had their next mating on average in 1.70 days (N = 47). Those that mated with a young virgin male had their second mating in 2.62 days (N = 22) and those that mated with an old virgin male had their second mating in 3.42 days (N = 31). Parametric survival analysis with a Weibull hazard function revealed that the initial rate of remating (ρ) was lower after mating with an old virgin male and faster after mating with a multiply mated male. In addition, κ<1 for all of the mating groups, showing that it was less likely for females to remate as they aged (Fig 2).


Effect of male mating history and age on remating by female European corn borer
Fitted parameters for Weibull hazard function for the time to remating for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a young virgin male (YVM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a multiple mated male (MMM).The lines enclose 95% confidence regions for the joint parameter estimates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383304&req=5

pone.0175512.g002: Fitted parameters for Weibull hazard function for the time to remating for Ostrinia nubilalis females that mated first with a young virgin male (YVM), an old (9 days old) virgin male (OVM) or a multiple mated male (MMM).The lines enclose 95% confidence regions for the joint parameter estimates.
Mentions: The period of time to remating was significantly different among the three groups (Fig 2). Females that mated with a multiply-mated male had their next mating on average in 1.70 days (N = 47). Those that mated with a young virgin male had their second mating in 2.62 days (N = 22) and those that mated with an old virgin male had their second mating in 3.42 days (N = 31). Parametric survival analysis with a Weibull hazard function revealed that the initial rate of remating (ρ) was lower after mating with an old virgin male and faster after mating with a multiply mated male. In addition, κ<1 for all of the mating groups, showing that it was less likely for females to remate as they aged (Fig 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

If mating with an inferior male has high fitness costs, females may try to avoid mating with these males. Alternatively, females may accept an inferior male to ensure they have obtained at least one mate, and/or to avoid the costs of resisting these males. We hypothesized that females compensate for mating with an inferior male by remating. We tested this hypothesis by measuring remating propensity in females that had mated with an old, multiply-mated male, a 9-day-old virgin male, or a young, virgin male. Females were more likely to remate when they had mated with multiply-mated males than when they had mated with a 9-day-old or young virgin male. We discuss the observed mating behavior by females in terms of sexual selection for multiple mating.

No MeSH data available.