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Decay and nutrient dynamics of coarse woody debris in the Qinling Mountains, China

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

As an ecological unit, coarse woody debris (CWD) plays an essential role in productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, community regeneration and biodiversity. However, thus far, the information on quantification the decomposition and nutrient content of CWD in forest ecosystems remains considerably limited. In this study, we conducted a long-term (1996–2013) study on decay and nutrient dynamics of CWD for evaluating accurately the ecological value of CWD on the Huoditang Experimental Forest Farm in the Qinling Mountains, China. The results demonstrated that there was a strong correlation between forest biomass and CWD mass. The single exponential decay model well fit the CWD density loss at this site, and as the CWD decomposed, the CWD density decreased significantly. Annual temperature and precipitation were all significantly correlated with the annual mass decay rate. The K contents and the C/N ratio of the CWD decreased as the CWD decayed, but the C, N, P, Ca and Mg contents increased. We observed a significant CWD decay effect on the soil C, N and Mg contents, especially the soil C content. The soil N, P, K, Ca and Mg contents exhibited large fluctuations, but the variation had no obvious regularity and changed with different decay times. The results showed that CWD was a critical component of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Further research is needed to determine the effect of diameter, plant tissue components, secondary wood compounds, and decomposer organisms on the CWD decay rates in the Qinling Mountains, which will be beneficial to clarifying the role of CWD in carbon cycles of forest ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


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The C/N ratio in the P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD at different decay times.Errors bars are based on plot as experimental unit (N = 3).
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pone.0175203.g008: The C/N ratio in the P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD at different decay times.Errors bars are based on plot as experimental unit (N = 3).

Mentions: As the CWD of P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata decomposed, the C/N ratio decreased significantly, and the C/N ratio of the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD exhibited more significant variation than that of the P. armandi CWD (Fig 8, P<0.01). However, during the 14 and 17 years of decay in the P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD, the decrease of the C/N ratio tended to get slower. There was no significant difference in the C/N ratio between the P. armandi (85.88±3.14) and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD (88.11±3.48) after 3 years of decay (P = 0.12). However, the C/N ratio of the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD (96.13±2.15) was significantly higher than that of the P. armandi CWD (88.34±4.85) after 1 year of decay (P<0.05), and the C/N ratio of the P. armandi CWD was significantly higher than that of the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD at the other decay times (P<0.05).


Decay and nutrient dynamics of coarse woody debris in the Qinling Mountains, China
The C/N ratio in the P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD at different decay times.Errors bars are based on plot as experimental unit (N = 3).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383274&req=5

pone.0175203.g008: The C/N ratio in the P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD at different decay times.Errors bars are based on plot as experimental unit (N = 3).
Mentions: As the CWD of P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata decomposed, the C/N ratio decreased significantly, and the C/N ratio of the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD exhibited more significant variation than that of the P. armandi CWD (Fig 8, P<0.01). However, during the 14 and 17 years of decay in the P. armandi and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD, the decrease of the C/N ratio tended to get slower. There was no significant difference in the C/N ratio between the P. armandi (85.88±3.14) and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD (88.11±3.48) after 3 years of decay (P = 0.12). However, the C/N ratio of the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD (96.13±2.15) was significantly higher than that of the P. armandi CWD (88.34±4.85) after 1 year of decay (P<0.05), and the C/N ratio of the P. armandi CWD was significantly higher than that of the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata CWD at the other decay times (P<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

As an ecological unit, coarse woody debris (CWD) plays an essential role in productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, community regeneration and biodiversity. However, thus far, the information on quantification the decomposition and nutrient content of CWD in forest ecosystems remains considerably limited. In this study, we conducted a long-term (1996&ndash;2013) study on decay and nutrient dynamics of CWD for evaluating accurately the ecological value of CWD on the Huoditang Experimental Forest Farm in the Qinling Mountains, China. The results demonstrated that there was a strong correlation between forest biomass and CWD mass. The single exponential decay model well fit the CWD density loss at this site, and as the CWD decomposed, the CWD density decreased significantly. Annual temperature and precipitation were all significantly correlated with the annual mass decay rate. The K contents and the C/N ratio of the CWD decreased as the CWD decayed, but the C, N, P, Ca and Mg contents increased. We observed a significant CWD decay effect on the soil C, N and Mg contents, especially the soil C content. The soil N, P, K, Ca and Mg contents exhibited large fluctuations, but the variation had no obvious regularity and changed with different decay times. The results showed that CWD was a critical component of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Further research is needed to determine the effect of diameter, plant tissue components, secondary wood compounds, and decomposer organisms on the CWD decay rates in the Qinling Mountains, which will be beneficial to clarifying the role of CWD in carbon cycles of forest ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus