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Short-term effects of weather and air pollution on atopic dermatitis symptoms in children: A panel study in Korea

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The effects of weather and air pollution on the severity and persistence of atopic dermatitis (AD) are important issues that have not been investigated in detail. The objective of our study was to determine the short-term effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on AD symptoms in children.

Methods: We enrolled 177 AD patients with 5 years or younger from the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea, and followed for 17 months between August 2013 and December 2014. Symptoms records of 35,158 person-days, including itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dry skin, oozing, and edema, were obtained. We estimated the effect of meteorological variables including daily mean temperature, relative humidity (RH), diurnal temperature range (DTR), rainfall and air pollutants including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and tropospheric ozone (O3) on AD symptoms using a generalized linear mixed model with adjustment for related confounding factors.

Results: A 5°C increase in outdoor temperature and a 5% increase in outdoor RH was associated with 12.8% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 10.5, 15.2) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.7, 4.7) decrease in AD symptoms, respectively, on the same day. An increase of rainfall by 5 mm increased AD symptoms by 7.3% (95% CI: 3.6, 11.1) for the days with <40 mm rainfall. The risk of AD symptoms increased by 284.9% (95% CI: 67.6, 784.2) according to a 5°C increase in DTR when it was >14°C. An increase in PM10, NO2, and O3 by 10 units increased the risk of AD symptoms on the same day by 3.2% (95% CI: 1.5, 4.9), 5.0% (95% CI: 1.4, 8.8), and 6.1% (95% CI: 3.2, 9.0), respectively.

Conclusion: Exposure to meteorological variables and air pollutants are associated with AD symptoms in young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms in boys (A) and girls (B).Data represent percent changes and 95% confidence intervals in AD symptoms per 5-unit increase in daily mean temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), diurnal temperature range (°C), and rainfall (mm) and 10-unit increase in PM10 (μg/m3), NO2 (ppb), and O3 (ppb). DTR: diurnal temperature range; RH: relative humidity; MA: moving average.
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pone.0175229.g003: Effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms in boys (A) and girls (B).Data represent percent changes and 95% confidence intervals in AD symptoms per 5-unit increase in daily mean temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), diurnal temperature range (°C), and rainfall (mm) and 10-unit increase in PM10 (μg/m3), NO2 (ppb), and O3 (ppb). DTR: diurnal temperature range; RH: relative humidity; MA: moving average.

Mentions: Fig 3 shows the effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on AD symptoms by sex. In both boys and girls, the positive association of temperature with AD symptoms was found. A similar result was observed in RH (Table 3). There was a significantly harmful effect of PM10 in girls, who showed a 5.2% (95% CI: 2.5, 8.0) change per 10 μg/m3 change in PM10 on the same day (MA0), whereas there was no such significant effect in boys. Boys exhibited 9.2% (95% CI: 4.4, 14.3) and 10.2% (95% CI: 6.4, 14.1) increases in AD symptoms by 10 ppb increase in NO2 and O3 concentration, respectively. However, there was no significant association of NO2 and O3 with AD symptoms in girls. These divergent effects between boys and girls more clearly observed when the moving average levels (MA0 to MA0-5) were fitted to the GLMM (Fig 3).


Short-term effects of weather and air pollution on atopic dermatitis symptoms in children: A panel study in Korea
Effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms in boys (A) and girls (B).Data represent percent changes and 95% confidence intervals in AD symptoms per 5-unit increase in daily mean temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), diurnal temperature range (°C), and rainfall (mm) and 10-unit increase in PM10 (μg/m3), NO2 (ppb), and O3 (ppb). DTR: diurnal temperature range; RH: relative humidity; MA: moving average.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383262&req=5

pone.0175229.g003: Effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms in boys (A) and girls (B).Data represent percent changes and 95% confidence intervals in AD symptoms per 5-unit increase in daily mean temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), diurnal temperature range (°C), and rainfall (mm) and 10-unit increase in PM10 (μg/m3), NO2 (ppb), and O3 (ppb). DTR: diurnal temperature range; RH: relative humidity; MA: moving average.
Mentions: Fig 3 shows the effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on AD symptoms by sex. In both boys and girls, the positive association of temperature with AD symptoms was found. A similar result was observed in RH (Table 3). There was a significantly harmful effect of PM10 in girls, who showed a 5.2% (95% CI: 2.5, 8.0) change per 10 μg/m3 change in PM10 on the same day (MA0), whereas there was no such significant effect in boys. Boys exhibited 9.2% (95% CI: 4.4, 14.3) and 10.2% (95% CI: 6.4, 14.1) increases in AD symptoms by 10 ppb increase in NO2 and O3 concentration, respectively. However, there was no significant association of NO2 and O3 with AD symptoms in girls. These divergent effects between boys and girls more clearly observed when the moving average levels (MA0 to MA0-5) were fitted to the GLMM (Fig 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The effects of weather and air pollution on the severity and persistence of atopic dermatitis (AD) are important issues that have not been investigated in detail. The objective of our study was to determine the short-term effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on AD symptoms in children.

Methods: We enrolled 177 AD patients with 5 years or younger from the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea, and followed for 17 months between August 2013 and December 2014. Symptoms records of 35,158 person-days, including itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dry skin, oozing, and edema, were obtained. We estimated the effect of meteorological variables including daily mean temperature, relative humidity (RH), diurnal temperature range (DTR), rainfall and air pollutants including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and tropospheric ozone (O3) on AD symptoms using a generalized linear mixed model with adjustment for related confounding factors.

Results: A 5°C increase in outdoor temperature and a 5% increase in outdoor RH was associated with 12.8% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 10.5, 15.2) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.7, 4.7) decrease in AD symptoms, respectively, on the same day. An increase of rainfall by 5 mm increased AD symptoms by 7.3% (95% CI: 3.6, 11.1) for the days with <40 mm rainfall. The risk of AD symptoms increased by 284.9% (95% CI: 67.6, 784.2) according to a 5°C increase in DTR when it was >14°C. An increase in PM10, NO2, and O3 by 10 units increased the risk of AD symptoms on the same day by 3.2% (95% CI: 1.5, 4.9), 5.0% (95% CI: 1.4, 8.8), and 6.1% (95% CI: 3.2, 9.0), respectively.

Conclusion: Exposure to meteorological variables and air pollutants are associated with AD symptoms in young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus