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Short-term effects of weather and air pollution on atopic dermatitis symptoms in children: A panel study in Korea

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The effects of weather and air pollution on the severity and persistence of atopic dermatitis (AD) are important issues that have not been investigated in detail. The objective of our study was to determine the short-term effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on AD symptoms in children.

Methods: We enrolled 177 AD patients with 5 years or younger from the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea, and followed for 17 months between August 2013 and December 2014. Symptoms records of 35,158 person-days, including itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dry skin, oozing, and edema, were obtained. We estimated the effect of meteorological variables including daily mean temperature, relative humidity (RH), diurnal temperature range (DTR), rainfall and air pollutants including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and tropospheric ozone (O3) on AD symptoms using a generalized linear mixed model with adjustment for related confounding factors.

Results: A 5°C increase in outdoor temperature and a 5% increase in outdoor RH was associated with 12.8% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 10.5, 15.2) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.7, 4.7) decrease in AD symptoms, respectively, on the same day. An increase of rainfall by 5 mm increased AD symptoms by 7.3% (95% CI: 3.6, 11.1) for the days with <40 mm rainfall. The risk of AD symptoms increased by 284.9% (95% CI: 67.6, 784.2) according to a 5°C increase in DTR when it was >14°C. An increase in PM10, NO2, and O3 by 10 units increased the risk of AD symptoms on the same day by 3.2% (95% CI: 1.5, 4.9), 5.0% (95% CI: 1.4, 8.8), and 6.1% (95% CI: 3.2, 9.0), respectively.

Conclusion: Exposure to meteorological variables and air pollutants are associated with AD symptoms in young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship of meteorological variables and air pollution with Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms. Each figure shows the spline curve (solid lines) with a 95% confidence intervals (two dashed lines). All variables are based on the same model on the same day, without using moving averages for the exposure to each risk factor. The model was controlled for the severity score at the initial visit, age, sex, presence of fever, and day of week (DOW). RH: relative humidity; DTR, diurnal temperature range; OR: odds ratio.
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pone.0175229.g001: Relationship of meteorological variables and air pollution with Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms. Each figure shows the spline curve (solid lines) with a 95% confidence intervals (two dashed lines). All variables are based on the same model on the same day, without using moving averages for the exposure to each risk factor. The model was controlled for the severity score at the initial visit, age, sex, presence of fever, and day of week (DOW). RH: relative humidity; DTR, diurnal temperature range; OR: odds ratio.

Mentions: The spline curves shown in Fig 1 demonstrate the relationship of meteorological variables and air pollution with the presence of AD symptoms on the same day (MA0). These results were obtained using GAMM fitting, controlling for SCORAD at enrollment, age, sex, fever, and DOW. The outdoor temperature showed negative linear relationships with AD symptoms. In contrast, the relationships of RH, rainfall, and DTR with AD symptoms were nonlinear. Interestingly, DTR and AD symptoms showed a positive relationship when DTR was above 14°C and daily rainfall was also positively related with AD symptoms when rainfall was less than approximately 40 mm/day. There was a negative relationship between RH and AD symptoms overall although the relationship was not linear.


Short-term effects of weather and air pollution on atopic dermatitis symptoms in children: A panel study in Korea
Relationship of meteorological variables and air pollution with Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms. Each figure shows the spline curve (solid lines) with a 95% confidence intervals (two dashed lines). All variables are based on the same model on the same day, without using moving averages for the exposure to each risk factor. The model was controlled for the severity score at the initial visit, age, sex, presence of fever, and day of week (DOW). RH: relative humidity; DTR, diurnal temperature range; OR: odds ratio.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383262&req=5

pone.0175229.g001: Relationship of meteorological variables and air pollution with Atopic Dermatitis (AD) symptoms. Each figure shows the spline curve (solid lines) with a 95% confidence intervals (two dashed lines). All variables are based on the same model on the same day, without using moving averages for the exposure to each risk factor. The model was controlled for the severity score at the initial visit, age, sex, presence of fever, and day of week (DOW). RH: relative humidity; DTR, diurnal temperature range; OR: odds ratio.
Mentions: The spline curves shown in Fig 1 demonstrate the relationship of meteorological variables and air pollution with the presence of AD symptoms on the same day (MA0). These results were obtained using GAMM fitting, controlling for SCORAD at enrollment, age, sex, fever, and DOW. The outdoor temperature showed negative linear relationships with AD symptoms. In contrast, the relationships of RH, rainfall, and DTR with AD symptoms were nonlinear. Interestingly, DTR and AD symptoms showed a positive relationship when DTR was above 14°C and daily rainfall was also positively related with AD symptoms when rainfall was less than approximately 40 mm/day. There was a negative relationship between RH and AD symptoms overall although the relationship was not linear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The effects of weather and air pollution on the severity and persistence of atopic dermatitis (AD) are important issues that have not been investigated in detail. The objective of our study was to determine the short-term effects of meteorological variables and air pollution on AD symptoms in children.

Methods: We enrolled 177 AD patients with 5 years or younger from the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea, and followed for 17 months between August 2013 and December 2014. Symptoms records of 35,158 person-days, including itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dry skin, oozing, and edema, were obtained. We estimated the effect of meteorological variables including daily mean temperature, relative humidity (RH), diurnal temperature range (DTR), rainfall and air pollutants including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and tropospheric ozone (O3) on AD symptoms using a generalized linear mixed model with adjustment for related confounding factors.

Results: A 5°C increase in outdoor temperature and a 5% increase in outdoor RH was associated with 12.8% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 10.5, 15.2) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.7, 4.7) decrease in AD symptoms, respectively, on the same day. An increase of rainfall by 5 mm increased AD symptoms by 7.3% (95% CI: 3.6, 11.1) for the days with <40 mm rainfall. The risk of AD symptoms increased by 284.9% (95% CI: 67.6, 784.2) according to a 5°C increase in DTR when it was >14°C. An increase in PM10, NO2, and O3 by 10 units increased the risk of AD symptoms on the same day by 3.2% (95% CI: 1.5, 4.9), 5.0% (95% CI: 1.4, 8.8), and 6.1% (95% CI: 3.2, 9.0), respectively.

Conclusion: Exposure to meteorological variables and air pollutants are associated with AD symptoms in young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus