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A novel low-complexity digital filter design for wearable ECG devices

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Wearable and implantable Electrocardiograph (ECG) devices are becoming prevailing tools for continuous real-time personal health monitoring. The ECG signal can be contaminated by various types of noise and artifacts (e.g., powerline interference, baseline wandering) that must be removed or suppressed for accurate ECG signal processing. Limited device size, power consumption and cost are critical issues that need to be carefully considered when designing any portable health monitoring device, including a battery-powered ECG device. This work presents a novel low-complexity noise suppression reconfigurable finite impulse response (FIR) filter structure for wearable ECG and heart monitoring devices. The design relies on a recently introduced optimally-factored FIR filter method. The new filter structure and several of its useful features are presented in detail. We also studied the hardware complexity of the proposed structure and compared it with the state-of-the-art. The results showed that the new ECG filter has a lower hardware complexity relative to the state-of-the-art ECG filters.

No MeSH data available.


Delay parameter in the optimally factored-cascade IFIR implementation of H(z).
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pone.0175139.g013: Delay parameter in the optimally factored-cascade IFIR implementation of H(z).

Mentions: The Fig 13H(z) implementation with the parameter Delay, is the extended version of Fig 10 where the ideal delay of 284 (half the effective order of the total filter) was considered. If the digital section of the ECG device includes a memory unit to record raw digital samples at the output of the analog-to-digital converter, located just before entering the digital filter, then the Delay parameter can be set equal to its ideal 284 value without needing any extra registers other than those used in U(z) (reusing the existing memory). Basically, the 285th data sample in memory is read, and fed to the positive input of the final adder shown in Fig 13.


A novel low-complexity digital filter design for wearable ECG devices
Delay parameter in the optimally factored-cascade IFIR implementation of H(z).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383230&req=5

pone.0175139.g013: Delay parameter in the optimally factored-cascade IFIR implementation of H(z).
Mentions: The Fig 13H(z) implementation with the parameter Delay, is the extended version of Fig 10 where the ideal delay of 284 (half the effective order of the total filter) was considered. If the digital section of the ECG device includes a memory unit to record raw digital samples at the output of the analog-to-digital converter, located just before entering the digital filter, then the Delay parameter can be set equal to its ideal 284 value without needing any extra registers other than those used in U(z) (reusing the existing memory). Basically, the 285th data sample in memory is read, and fed to the positive input of the final adder shown in Fig 13.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Wearable and implantable Electrocardiograph (ECG) devices are becoming prevailing tools for continuous real-time personal health monitoring. The ECG signal can be contaminated by various types of noise and artifacts (e.g., powerline interference, baseline wandering) that must be removed or suppressed for accurate ECG signal processing. Limited device size, power consumption and cost are critical issues that need to be carefully considered when designing any portable health monitoring device, including a battery-powered ECG device. This work presents a novel low-complexity noise suppression reconfigurable finite impulse response (FIR) filter structure for wearable ECG and heart monitoring devices. The design relies on a recently introduced optimally-factored FIR filter method. The new filter structure and several of its useful features are presented in detail. We also studied the hardware complexity of the proposed structure and compared it with the state-of-the-art. The results showed that the new ECG filter has a lower hardware complexity relative to the state-of-the-art ECG filters.

No MeSH data available.