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A novel low-complexity digital filter design for wearable ECG devices

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Wearable and implantable Electrocardiograph (ECG) devices are becoming prevailing tools for continuous real-time personal health monitoring. The ECG signal can be contaminated by various types of noise and artifacts (e.g., powerline interference, baseline wandering) that must be removed or suppressed for accurate ECG signal processing. Limited device size, power consumption and cost are critical issues that need to be carefully considered when designing any portable health monitoring device, including a battery-powered ECG device. This work presents a novel low-complexity noise suppression reconfigurable finite impulse response (FIR) filter structure for wearable ECG and heart monitoring devices. The design relies on a recently introduced optimally-factored FIR filter method. The new filter structure and several of its useful features are presented in detail. We also studied the hardware complexity of the proposed structure and compared it with the state-of-the-art. The results showed that the new ECG filter has a lower hardware complexity relative to the state-of-the-art ECG filters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Optimum Stretch Factor for IFIR implementation of UPartial(z).
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pone.0175139.g006: Optimum Stretch Factor for IFIR implementation of UPartial(z).

Mentions: Our analysis revealed that the optimum value of the stretch factor L for the IFIR implementation of UPartial(z) is 20. As Fig 6 depicts, the choice of L = 20 minimizes the approximate total number of multipliers to 31.


A novel low-complexity digital filter design for wearable ECG devices
Optimum Stretch Factor for IFIR implementation of UPartial(z).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383230&req=5

pone.0175139.g006: Optimum Stretch Factor for IFIR implementation of UPartial(z).
Mentions: Our analysis revealed that the optimum value of the stretch factor L for the IFIR implementation of UPartial(z) is 20. As Fig 6 depicts, the choice of L = 20 minimizes the approximate total number of multipliers to 31.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Wearable and implantable Electrocardiograph (ECG) devices are becoming prevailing tools for continuous real-time personal health monitoring. The ECG signal can be contaminated by various types of noise and artifacts (e.g., powerline interference, baseline wandering) that must be removed or suppressed for accurate ECG signal processing. Limited device size, power consumption and cost are critical issues that need to be carefully considered when designing any portable health monitoring device, including a battery-powered ECG device. This work presents a novel low-complexity noise suppression reconfigurable finite impulse response (FIR) filter structure for wearable ECG and heart monitoring devices. The design relies on a recently introduced optimally-factored FIR filter method. The new filter structure and several of its useful features are presented in detail. We also studied the hardware complexity of the proposed structure and compared it with the state-of-the-art. The results showed that the new ECG filter has a lower hardware complexity relative to the state-of-the-art ECG filters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus