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Facing the challenges in ophthalmology clerkship teaching: Is flipped classroom the answer?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Recent reform of medical education highlights the growing concerns about the capability of the current educational model to equip medical school students with essential skills for future career development. In the field of ophthalmology, although many attempts have been made to address the problem of the decreasing teaching time and the increasing load of course content, a growing body of literature indicates the need to reform the current ophthalmology teaching strategies. Flipped classroom is a new pedagogical model in which students develop a basic understanding of the course materials before class, and use in-class time for learner-centered activities, such as group discussion and presentation. However, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of the flipped classroom in ophthalmology education. This study, for the first time, assesses the use of flipped classroom in ophthalmology, specifically glaucoma and ocular trauma clerkship teaching. A total number of 44 international medical school students from diverse background were enrolled in this study, and randomly divided into two groups. One group took the flipped glaucoma classroom and lecture-based ocular trauma classroom, while the other group took the flipped ocular trauma classroom and lecture-based glaucoma classroom. In the traditional lecture-based classroom, students attended the didactic lecture and did the homework after class. In the flipped classroom, students were asked to watch the prerecorded lectures before the class, and use the class time for homework discussion. Both the teachers and students were asked to complete feedback questionnaires after the classroom. We found that the two groups did not show differences in the final exam scores. However, the flipped classroom helped students to develop skills in problem solving, creative thinking and team working. Also, compared to the lecture-based classroom, both teachers and students were more satisfied with the flipped classroom. Interestingly, students had a more positive attitude towards the flipped ocular trauma classroom than the flipped glaucoma classroom regarding the teaching process, the course materials, and the value of the classroom. Therefore, the flipped classroom model in ophthalmology teaching showed promise as an effective approach to promote active learning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of students’ exam scores before and after the classroom.Students were asked to answer 20 glaucoma and 20 ocular trauma multiple choice questions before (A) and after (B) taking the classroom. Each question had the same weight, and the total score was converted into a 0–100 scale. Independent samples t test was used to compare the differences between the two groups. All data were presented as mean± S.D. n = 22.
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pone.0174829.g001: Comparison of students’ exam scores before and after the classroom.Students were asked to answer 20 glaucoma and 20 ocular trauma multiple choice questions before (A) and after (B) taking the classroom. Each question had the same weight, and the total score was converted into a 0–100 scale. Independent samples t test was used to compare the differences between the two groups. All data were presented as mean± S.D. n = 22.

Mentions: In the pre-class quiz, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in either glaucoma scores (t = 0.026, P = 0.979) or ocular trauma scores (t = 1.452, P = 0.154), suggesting that the baseline understandings to glaucoma and ocular trauma in the two groups were comparable (Fig 1A). The final exam score showed that there were no statistical differences between the two groups in either glaucoma scores (t = 0.782, P = 0.439) or ocular trauma scores (t = 0.979, P = 0.334) (Fig 1B). This result indicated that the flipped classroom approach did not increase the scores of students in the final exam.


Facing the challenges in ophthalmology clerkship teaching: Is flipped classroom the answer?
Comparison of students’ exam scores before and after the classroom.Students were asked to answer 20 glaucoma and 20 ocular trauma multiple choice questions before (A) and after (B) taking the classroom. Each question had the same weight, and the total score was converted into a 0–100 scale. Independent samples t test was used to compare the differences between the two groups. All data were presented as mean± S.D. n = 22.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5383227&req=5

pone.0174829.g001: Comparison of students’ exam scores before and after the classroom.Students were asked to answer 20 glaucoma and 20 ocular trauma multiple choice questions before (A) and after (B) taking the classroom. Each question had the same weight, and the total score was converted into a 0–100 scale. Independent samples t test was used to compare the differences between the two groups. All data were presented as mean± S.D. n = 22.
Mentions: In the pre-class quiz, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in either glaucoma scores (t = 0.026, P = 0.979) or ocular trauma scores (t = 1.452, P = 0.154), suggesting that the baseline understandings to glaucoma and ocular trauma in the two groups were comparable (Fig 1A). The final exam score showed that there were no statistical differences between the two groups in either glaucoma scores (t = 0.782, P = 0.439) or ocular trauma scores (t = 0.979, P = 0.334) (Fig 1B). This result indicated that the flipped classroom approach did not increase the scores of students in the final exam.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Recent reform of medical education highlights the growing concerns about the capability of the current educational model to equip medical school students with essential skills for future career development. In the field of ophthalmology, although many attempts have been made to address the problem of the decreasing teaching time and the increasing load of course content, a growing body of literature indicates the need to reform the current ophthalmology teaching strategies. Flipped classroom is a new pedagogical model in which students develop a basic understanding of the course materials before class, and use in-class time for learner-centered activities, such as group discussion and presentation. However, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of the flipped classroom in ophthalmology education. This study, for the first time, assesses the use of flipped classroom in ophthalmology, specifically glaucoma and ocular trauma clerkship teaching. A total number of 44 international medical school students from diverse background were enrolled in this study, and randomly divided into two groups. One group took the flipped glaucoma classroom and lecture-based ocular trauma classroom, while the other group took the flipped ocular trauma classroom and lecture-based glaucoma classroom. In the traditional lecture-based classroom, students attended the didactic lecture and did the homework after class. In the flipped classroom, students were asked to watch the prerecorded lectures before the class, and use the class time for homework discussion. Both the teachers and students were asked to complete feedback questionnaires after the classroom. We found that the two groups did not show differences in the final exam scores. However, the flipped classroom helped students to develop skills in problem solving, creative thinking and team working. Also, compared to the lecture-based classroom, both teachers and students were more satisfied with the flipped classroom. Interestingly, students had a more positive attitude towards the flipped ocular trauma classroom than the flipped glaucoma classroom regarding the teaching process, the course materials, and the value of the classroom. Therefore, the flipped classroom model in ophthalmology teaching showed promise as an effective approach to promote active learning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus