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Better than sham? A double-blind placebo-controlled neurofeedback study in primary insomnia

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

See Thibault et al. (doi:10.1093/awx033) for a scientific commentary on this article.

Neurofeedback has been claimed to have therapeutic efficacy in multiple disorders. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in insomnia, Schabus et al. report that sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback (12–15 Hz) neither changes the EEG nor objectively improves sleep. While patients do report subjective improvements, these do not differ from those seen with placebo feedback.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of NFT/PFT training on SMR band power during training. Note that as a group all patients [patients with insomnia (INs), misperception insomniacs (MPs)] were able to significantly increase power in the SMR frequency band during NFT (as compared to PFT). A group of young healthy neurofeedback controls (NC) is plotted for comparison. Note that the x-axis informs about the rewarded frequency bands for PFT and NFT. Training sessions 2 and 12 are not displayed due to technical problems.
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awx011-F2: Effects of NFT/PFT training on SMR band power during training. Note that as a group all patients [patients with insomnia (INs), misperception insomniacs (MPs)] were able to significantly increase power in the SMR frequency band during NFT (as compared to PFT). A group of young healthy neurofeedback controls (NC) is plotted for comparison. Note that the x-axis informs about the rewarded frequency bands for PFT and NFT. Training sessions 2 and 12 are not displayed due to technical problems.

Mentions: Confirming our expectations, we found significant differences between the two training conditions (i.e. NFT and PFT) and our patient groups (i.e. patients with insomnia and misperception insomniacs) when looking at objective EEG changes following NFT and PFT (Fig. 2).Figure 2


Better than sham? A double-blind placebo-controlled neurofeedback study in primary insomnia
Effects of NFT/PFT training on SMR band power during training. Note that as a group all patients [patients with insomnia (INs), misperception insomniacs (MPs)] were able to significantly increase power in the SMR frequency band during NFT (as compared to PFT). A group of young healthy neurofeedback controls (NC) is plotted for comparison. Note that the x-axis informs about the rewarded frequency bands for PFT and NFT. Training sessions 2 and 12 are not displayed due to technical problems.
© Copyright Policy - cc-by-nc
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382955&req=5

awx011-F2: Effects of NFT/PFT training on SMR band power during training. Note that as a group all patients [patients with insomnia (INs), misperception insomniacs (MPs)] were able to significantly increase power in the SMR frequency band during NFT (as compared to PFT). A group of young healthy neurofeedback controls (NC) is plotted for comparison. Note that the x-axis informs about the rewarded frequency bands for PFT and NFT. Training sessions 2 and 12 are not displayed due to technical problems.
Mentions: Confirming our expectations, we found significant differences between the two training conditions (i.e. NFT and PFT) and our patient groups (i.e. patients with insomnia and misperception insomniacs) when looking at objective EEG changes following NFT and PFT (Fig. 2).Figure 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

See Thibault et al. (doi:10.1093/awx033) for a scientific commentary on this article.

Neurofeedback has been claimed to have therapeutic efficacy in multiple disorders. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in insomnia, Schabus et al. report that sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback (12–15 Hz) neither changes the EEG nor objectively improves sleep. While patients do report subjective improvements, these do not differ from those seen with placebo feedback.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus