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Relationships between flortaucipir PET tau binding and amyloid burden, clinical diagnosis, age and cognition

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ABSTRACT

The relation between tau, amyloid and cognition has yet to be fully defined. Using flortaucipir (18F-AV-1451) PET tau imaging in patients with varying amyloid and cognitive status, Pontecorvo et al. suggest that development of tau beyond the mesial temporal lobe is associated with, and may be dependent on, amyloid accumulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flortaucipir voxel-wise SUVr images for representative individual Aβ− control (YCN/OCN) and Aβ+ OCN, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. (A) Aβ− control (YNC/OCN), (B–D) Aβ+ OCN, MCI and Alzheimer’s disease subjects, respectively. PET images are scaled from 1–2.5 SUVr units and overlaid on each subject’s respective MRI. Note in addition to differences in overall extent of retention, there are also subjects with relatively limbic sparing (D, first row) and limbic predominant (D, third row) patterns (arrows) consistent with the pathology literature (Murray et al., 2011). AD = Alzheimer’s disease; y/o = years old.
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aww334-F2: Flortaucipir voxel-wise SUVr images for representative individual Aβ− control (YCN/OCN) and Aβ+ OCN, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. (A) Aβ− control (YNC/OCN), (B–D) Aβ+ OCN, MCI and Alzheimer’s disease subjects, respectively. PET images are scaled from 1–2.5 SUVr units and overlaid on each subject’s respective MRI. Note in addition to differences in overall extent of retention, there are also subjects with relatively limbic sparing (D, first row) and limbic predominant (D, third row) patterns (arrows) consistent with the pathology literature (Murray et al., 2011). AD = Alzheimer’s disease; y/o = years old.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows tracer retention in representative individual young and older Aβ− cognitively normal and in Aβ+ OCN, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. The tracer retention in individual Aβ+ subjects was consistent with the pattern described above, in that the lateral temporal lobes appeared to be the first and most common area affected in individuals. However, there was considerable variability in extent and laterality of affected areas in individual subjects, with some Aβ+ subjects showing flortaucipir retention limited to focal regions of the temporal lobe, and others showing widespread distribution to posterior regions and in some cases frontal lobes. In some cases flortaucipir distribution was symmetrical, but in other cases flortaucipir retention was markedly greater in one hemisphere than the other. In addition, there were also differences across Aβ+ subjects with respect to the relative intensities in limbic versus cortical regions (e.g. Fig. 2D row 1 versus 3) that may reflect varying patterns of tau distribution recently noted in the pathology literature (Murray et al., 2011).Figure 2


Relationships between flortaucipir PET tau binding and amyloid burden, clinical diagnosis, age and cognition
Flortaucipir voxel-wise SUVr images for representative individual Aβ− control (YCN/OCN) and Aβ+ OCN, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. (A) Aβ− control (YNC/OCN), (B–D) Aβ+ OCN, MCI and Alzheimer’s disease subjects, respectively. PET images are scaled from 1–2.5 SUVr units and overlaid on each subject’s respective MRI. Note in addition to differences in overall extent of retention, there are also subjects with relatively limbic sparing (D, first row) and limbic predominant (D, third row) patterns (arrows) consistent with the pathology literature (Murray et al., 2011). AD = Alzheimer’s disease; y/o = years old.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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aww334-F2: Flortaucipir voxel-wise SUVr images for representative individual Aβ− control (YCN/OCN) and Aβ+ OCN, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. (A) Aβ− control (YNC/OCN), (B–D) Aβ+ OCN, MCI and Alzheimer’s disease subjects, respectively. PET images are scaled from 1–2.5 SUVr units and overlaid on each subject’s respective MRI. Note in addition to differences in overall extent of retention, there are also subjects with relatively limbic sparing (D, first row) and limbic predominant (D, third row) patterns (arrows) consistent with the pathology literature (Murray et al., 2011). AD = Alzheimer’s disease; y/o = years old.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows tracer retention in representative individual young and older Aβ− cognitively normal and in Aβ+ OCN, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. The tracer retention in individual Aβ+ subjects was consistent with the pattern described above, in that the lateral temporal lobes appeared to be the first and most common area affected in individuals. However, there was considerable variability in extent and laterality of affected areas in individual subjects, with some Aβ+ subjects showing flortaucipir retention limited to focal regions of the temporal lobe, and others showing widespread distribution to posterior regions and in some cases frontal lobes. In some cases flortaucipir distribution was symmetrical, but in other cases flortaucipir retention was markedly greater in one hemisphere than the other. In addition, there were also differences across Aβ+ subjects with respect to the relative intensities in limbic versus cortical regions (e.g. Fig. 2D row 1 versus 3) that may reflect varying patterns of tau distribution recently noted in the pathology literature (Murray et al., 2011).Figure 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The relation between tau, amyloid and cognition has yet to be fully defined. Using flortaucipir (18F-AV-1451) PET tau imaging in patients with varying amyloid and cognitive status, Pontecorvo et al. suggest that development of tau beyond the mesial temporal lobe is associated with, and may be dependent on, amyloid accumulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus