Limits...
Variegated tropical landscapes conserve diverse dung beetle communities

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Conserving biodiversity in tropical landscapes is a major challenge to scientists and conservationists. Current rates of deforestation, fragmentation, and land use intensification are producing variegated landscapes with undetermined values for the conservation of biological communities and ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigate the importance of tropical variegated landscapes to biodiversity conservation, using dung beetle as focal taxa.

Methods: The study was carried out in 12 variegated landscapes where dung beetles were sampled using six pitfall traps, 30 m apart from each other, along a transect in each studied landscape use and cover classes—LUCC (forest fragment and corridor, coffee plantation, and pasture). We baited each pitfall trap with 30 g of human feces and left open for a 48 h period. We also measured three environmental variables reflecting structural differences among the studied classes: canopy cover, local vegetation heterogeneity and soil sand content.

Results: We collected 52 species and 2,695 individuals of dung beetles. We observed significant differences in the mean species richness, abundance and biomass among classes, with forest fragments presenting the highest values, forest corridors and coffee plantations presenting intermediate values, and pastures the lowest values. Regarding community structure, we also found significant differences among classes. Canopy cover was the only variable explaining variation in dung beetle species richness, abundance, biomass, and community structure. The relative importance of spatial turnover was greater than nestedness-resultant component in all studied landscapes.

Discussion: This study evaluated the ecological patterns of dung beetle communities in variegated tropical landscapes highlighting the importance of these landscapes for conservation of tropical biodiversity. However, we encourage variegation for the management of landscapes that have already been fragmented or as a complementary initiative of current conservation practices (e.g., protection of natural habitats and establishment of reserves).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PCO biplot of Bray–Curtis similarity matrix based on square-root transformed dung beetle abundance data in land use and cover classes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382926&req=5

fig-4: PCO biplot of Bray–Curtis similarity matrix based on square-root transformed dung beetle abundance data in land use and cover classes.

Mentions: The PCO revealed three distinct groups (forest fragment + forest corridor, coffee plantation, and pasture) with axis 1 and 2 explaining 43.6% of the variation in structure (species composition—Fig. 4). However, dung beetle community structure was significantly different among the LUCCs (PERMANOVA, pseudo-F = 8.0969, p = 0.001, df = 3) (Table S4). The LUCCs also exhibited differences in the dispersion of the variance of the community structure data (PERMDISP, F = 3.5964, p = 0.05, df = 3), with higher values in pasture in comparison to forest fragment (t = 2.9631, p = 0.017) and coffee plantation (t = 4.1819, p = 0.003) (Table S4).


Variegated tropical landscapes conserve diverse dung beetle communities
PCO biplot of Bray–Curtis similarity matrix based on square-root transformed dung beetle abundance data in land use and cover classes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382926&req=5

fig-4: PCO biplot of Bray–Curtis similarity matrix based on square-root transformed dung beetle abundance data in land use and cover classes.
Mentions: The PCO revealed three distinct groups (forest fragment + forest corridor, coffee plantation, and pasture) with axis 1 and 2 explaining 43.6% of the variation in structure (species composition—Fig. 4). However, dung beetle community structure was significantly different among the LUCCs (PERMANOVA, pseudo-F = 8.0969, p = 0.001, df = 3) (Table S4). The LUCCs also exhibited differences in the dispersion of the variance of the community structure data (PERMDISP, F = 3.5964, p = 0.05, df = 3), with higher values in pasture in comparison to forest fragment (t = 2.9631, p = 0.017) and coffee plantation (t = 4.1819, p = 0.003) (Table S4).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Conserving biodiversity in tropical landscapes is a major challenge to scientists and conservationists. Current rates of deforestation, fragmentation, and land use intensification are producing variegated landscapes with undetermined values for the conservation of biological communities and ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigate the importance of tropical variegated landscapes to biodiversity conservation, using dung beetle as focal taxa.

Methods: The study was carried out in 12 variegated landscapes where dung beetles were sampled using six pitfall traps, 30 m apart from each other, along a transect in each studied landscape use and cover classes—LUCC (forest fragment and corridor, coffee plantation, and pasture). We baited each pitfall trap with 30 g of human feces and left open for a 48 h period. We also measured three environmental variables reflecting structural differences among the studied classes: canopy cover, local vegetation heterogeneity and soil sand content.

Results: We collected 52 species and 2,695 individuals of dung beetles. We observed significant differences in the mean species richness, abundance and biomass among classes, with forest fragments presenting the highest values, forest corridors and coffee plantations presenting intermediate values, and pastures the lowest values. Regarding community structure, we also found significant differences among classes. Canopy cover was the only variable explaining variation in dung beetle species richness, abundance, biomass, and community structure. The relative importance of spatial turnover was greater than nestedness-resultant component in all studied landscapes.

Discussion: This study evaluated the ecological patterns of dung beetle communities in variegated tropical landscapes highlighting the importance of these landscapes for conservation of tropical biodiversity. However, we encourage variegation for the management of landscapes that have already been fragmented or as a complementary initiative of current conservation practices (e.g., protection of natural habitats and establishment of reserves).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus