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The effect of the serum corona on interactions between a single nano-object and a living cell

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ABSTRACT

Nanoparticles (NPs) which enter physiological fluids are rapidly coated by proteins, forming a so-called corona which may strongly modify their interaction with tissues and cells relative to the bare NPs. In this work the interactions between a living cell and a nano-object, and in particular the effect on this of the adsorption of serum proteins, are directly examined by measuring the forces arising as an Atomic Force Microscope tip (diameter 20 nm) - simulating a nano-object - approaches and contacts a cell. We find that the presence of a serum protein corona on the tip strongly modifies the interaction as indicated by pronounced increase in the indentation, hysteresis and work of adhesion compared to a bare tip. Classically one expects an AFM tip interacting with a cell surface to be repelled due to cell elastic distortion, offset by tip-cell adhesion, and indeed such a model fits the bare-tip/cell interaction, in agreement with earlier work. However, the force plots obtained with serum-modified tips are very different, indicating that the cell is much more compliant to the approaching tip. The insights obtained in this work may promote better design of NPs for drug delivery and other nano-medical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic force profile and the retrieved adhesion, hysteresis and indentation parameters.
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f1: Schematic force profile and the retrieved adhesion, hysteresis and indentation parameters.

Mentions: Cell imaging and force measurements were carried out using a scanning force-probe device employing very sensitive commercially-available cantilevers. Force-separation cycles were carried out as described in Materials and Methods. Each force-separation curve was analysed to evaluate the amount of indentation, defined as the vertical distance the tip travelled from the contact point to the trigger point; hysteresis, representing the dissipated energy; and work of adhesion, as shown schematically in Fig. 1 (and on an actual force curve in the supplementary information (S2)).


The effect of the serum corona on interactions between a single nano-object and a living cell
Schematic force profile and the retrieved adhesion, hysteresis and indentation parameters.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382918&req=5

f1: Schematic force profile and the retrieved adhesion, hysteresis and indentation parameters.
Mentions: Cell imaging and force measurements were carried out using a scanning force-probe device employing very sensitive commercially-available cantilevers. Force-separation cycles were carried out as described in Materials and Methods. Each force-separation curve was analysed to evaluate the amount of indentation, defined as the vertical distance the tip travelled from the contact point to the trigger point; hysteresis, representing the dissipated energy; and work of adhesion, as shown schematically in Fig. 1 (and on an actual force curve in the supplementary information (S2)).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Nanoparticles (NPs) which enter physiological fluids are rapidly coated by proteins, forming a so-called corona which may strongly modify their interaction with tissues and cells relative to the bare NPs. In this work the interactions between a living cell and a nano-object, and in particular the effect on this of the adsorption of serum proteins, are directly examined by measuring the forces arising as an Atomic Force Microscope tip (diameter 20 nm) - simulating a nano-object - approaches and contacts a cell. We find that the presence of a serum protein corona on the tip strongly modifies the interaction as indicated by pronounced increase in the indentation, hysteresis and work of adhesion compared to a bare tip. Classically one expects an AFM tip interacting with a cell surface to be repelled due to cell elastic distortion, offset by tip-cell adhesion, and indeed such a model fits the bare-tip/cell interaction, in agreement with earlier work. However, the force plots obtained with serum-modified tips are very different, indicating that the cell is much more compliant to the approaching tip. The insights obtained in this work may promote better design of NPs for drug delivery and other nano-medical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus