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Dental prostheses mimic the natural enamel behavior under functional loading: A review article

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramic dental restorations are designed to repair functionality as well as esthetics of the failed teeth. However, these materials exhibited several performance deficiencies such as fracture, poor esthetic properties of ceramic cores (particularly zirconia cores), and difficulty in accomplishing a strong ceramic–resin-based cement bond. Therefore, improving the mechanical properties of these ceramic materials is of great interest in a wide range of disciplines. Consequently, spatial gradients in surface composition and structure can improve the mechanical integrity of ceramic dental restorations. Thus, this article reviews the current status of the functionally graded dental prostheses inspired by the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ) structures and the linear gradation in Young's modulus of the DEJ, as a new material design approach, to improve the performance compared to traditional dental prostheses. This is a remarkable example of nature's ability to engineer functionally graded dental prostheses. The current article opens a new avenue for recent researches aimed at the further development of new ceramic dental restorations for improving their clinical durability.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic of the conventional sharp restoration and the new graded approach.
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fig0020: Schematic of the conventional sharp restoration and the new graded approach.

Mentions: Among the previously mentioned processing methods, the glass infiltration technology is particularly suitable for the fabrication of all-ceramic restorations [128]. It combines an esthetic, low modulus, and low hardness glass “veneer” with a high strength ceramic “core”, without a sharp interface between the materials (Fig. 4). The lack of interface due to grading improves interfacial bond strengths, reduces residual stresses, and eliminates delaminations. The processing of these structures is simple and straightforward, and can be readily adapted to CAD/CAM technology [128], [130], [131].


Dental prostheses mimic the natural enamel behavior under functional loading: A review article
Schematic of the conventional sharp restoration and the new graded approach.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382785&req=5

fig0020: Schematic of the conventional sharp restoration and the new graded approach.
Mentions: Among the previously mentioned processing methods, the glass infiltration technology is particularly suitable for the fabrication of all-ceramic restorations [128]. It combines an esthetic, low modulus, and low hardness glass “veneer” with a high strength ceramic “core”, without a sharp interface between the materials (Fig. 4). The lack of interface due to grading improves interfacial bond strengths, reduces residual stresses, and eliminates delaminations. The processing of these structures is simple and straightforward, and can be readily adapted to CAD/CAM technology [128], [130], [131].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramic dental restorations are designed to repair functionality as well as esthetics of the failed teeth. However, these materials exhibited several performance deficiencies such as fracture, poor esthetic properties of ceramic cores (particularly zirconia cores), and difficulty in accomplishing a strong ceramic–resin-based cement bond. Therefore, improving the mechanical properties of these ceramic materials is of great interest in a wide range of disciplines. Consequently, spatial gradients in surface composition and structure can improve the mechanical integrity of ceramic dental restorations. Thus, this article reviews the current status of the functionally graded dental prostheses inspired by the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ) structures and the linear gradation in Young's modulus of the DEJ, as a new material design approach, to improve the performance compared to traditional dental prostheses. This is a remarkable example of nature's ability to engineer functionally graded dental prostheses. The current article opens a new avenue for recent researches aimed at the further development of new ceramic dental restorations for improving their clinical durability.

No MeSH data available.