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Outbreaks of Disease Associated with Food Imported into the United States, 1996 – 2014 1

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ABSTRACT

The proportion of US food that is imported is increasing; most seafood and half of fruits are imported. We identified a small but increasing number of foodborne disease outbreaks associated with imported foods, most commonly fish and produce. New outbreak investigation tools and federal regulatory authority are key to maintaining food safety.

No MeSH data available.


Number of outbreaks caused by imported foods and total number of outbreaks with a food reported, United States, 1996–2014. Reporting practices changed over time; 1973–1997, imported foods anecdotally noted in report comments; 1998–2008, “contaminated food imported into U.S.” included as a location where food was prepared; 2009–2014, reporting jurisdictions could indicate whether each food is imported (yes/no) and the country of origin.
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Figure 1: Number of outbreaks caused by imported foods and total number of outbreaks with a food reported, United States, 1996–2014. Reporting practices changed over time; 1973–1997, imported foods anecdotally noted in report comments; 1998–2008, “contaminated food imported into U.S.” included as a location where food was prepared; 2009–2014, reporting jurisdictions could indicate whether each food is imported (yes/no) and the country of origin.

Mentions: During 1996–2014, a total of 195 outbreak investigations implicated an imported food, resulting in 10,685 illnesses, 1,017 hospitalizations, and 19 deaths. Outbreaks associated with imported foods represented an increasing proportion of all foodborne disease outbreaks where a food was implicated and reported (1% during 1996–2000 vs. 5% during 2009–2014). The number of outbreaks associated with an imported food increased from an average of 3 per year during 1996–2000 to an average of 18 per year during 2009–2014 (Figure).


Outbreaks of Disease Associated with Food Imported into the United States, 1996 – 2014 1
Number of outbreaks caused by imported foods and total number of outbreaks with a food reported, United States, 1996–2014. Reporting practices changed over time; 1973–1997, imported foods anecdotally noted in report comments; 1998–2008, “contaminated food imported into U.S.” included as a location where food was prepared; 2009–2014, reporting jurisdictions could indicate whether each food is imported (yes/no) and the country of origin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382743&req=5

Figure 1: Number of outbreaks caused by imported foods and total number of outbreaks with a food reported, United States, 1996–2014. Reporting practices changed over time; 1973–1997, imported foods anecdotally noted in report comments; 1998–2008, “contaminated food imported into U.S.” included as a location where food was prepared; 2009–2014, reporting jurisdictions could indicate whether each food is imported (yes/no) and the country of origin.
Mentions: During 1996–2014, a total of 195 outbreak investigations implicated an imported food, resulting in 10,685 illnesses, 1,017 hospitalizations, and 19 deaths. Outbreaks associated with imported foods represented an increasing proportion of all foodborne disease outbreaks where a food was implicated and reported (1% during 1996–2000 vs. 5% during 2009–2014). The number of outbreaks associated with an imported food increased from an average of 3 per year during 1996–2000 to an average of 18 per year during 2009–2014 (Figure).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The proportion of US food that is imported is increasing; most seafood and half of fruits are imported. We identified a small but increasing number of foodborne disease outbreaks associated with imported foods, most commonly fish and produce. New outbreak investigation tools and federal regulatory authority are key to maintaining food safety.

No MeSH data available.