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Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India

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ABSTRACT

We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intestine from a wild bull elephant, estimated at 20 years of age, Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, India, 2007. Multiple white-to-tan discrete nodules (granulomas) are protruding from the serosal surface, and less well-defined areas of pale discoloration are visible within the intestinal wall. Serosal blood vessels are markedly dilated, tortuous, and congested.
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Figure 1: Intestine from a wild bull elephant, estimated at 20 years of age, Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, India, 2007. Multiple white-to-tan discrete nodules (granulomas) are protruding from the serosal surface, and less well-defined areas of pale discoloration are visible within the intestinal wall. Serosal blood vessels are markedly dilated, tortuous, and congested.

Mentions: In March 2007, an emaciated wild bull elephant, estimated to be 20 years of age, died shortly after it was found recumbent in the Muthanga range of the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary in southern India (case 1). Postmortem examination revealed purulent exudates throughout the lungs, an enlarged liver, enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes, surface nodules containing caseated yellowish-white material (Figure 1). We found serosanguinous fluid in the pericardial sac and slightly hypertrophied heart ventricles. We saw focal areas of necrosis in the renal cortices but noted no other gross lesions. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of lung, liver, kidney, and mesenteric lymph node impression smears revealed numerous acid-fast bacilli. We confirmed the presence of M. tuberculosis by using PCR amplification of the targeted bacterial genome, gel documentation of the amplified products, and sequencing.


Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India
Intestine from a wild bull elephant, estimated at 20 years of age, Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, India, 2007. Multiple white-to-tan discrete nodules (granulomas) are protruding from the serosal surface, and less well-defined areas of pale discoloration are visible within the intestinal wall. Serosal blood vessels are markedly dilated, tortuous, and congested.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382741&req=5

Figure 1: Intestine from a wild bull elephant, estimated at 20 years of age, Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, India, 2007. Multiple white-to-tan discrete nodules (granulomas) are protruding from the serosal surface, and less well-defined areas of pale discoloration are visible within the intestinal wall. Serosal blood vessels are markedly dilated, tortuous, and congested.
Mentions: In March 2007, an emaciated wild bull elephant, estimated to be 20 years of age, died shortly after it was found recumbent in the Muthanga range of the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary in southern India (case 1). Postmortem examination revealed purulent exudates throughout the lungs, an enlarged liver, enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes, surface nodules containing caseated yellowish-white material (Figure 1). We found serosanguinous fluid in the pericardial sac and slightly hypertrophied heart ventricles. We saw focal areas of necrosis in the renal cortices but noted no other gross lesions. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of lung, liver, kidney, and mesenteric lymph node impression smears revealed numerous acid-fast bacilli. We confirmed the presence of M. tuberculosis by using PCR amplification of the targeted bacterial genome, gel documentation of the amplified products, and sequencing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus