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Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis Disease in Humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002 – 2014

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Despite control efforts, Mycobacterium bovis incidence among cattle remains high in parts of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, attracting political and public health interest in potential spread from animals to humans. To determine incidence among humans and to identify associated factors, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of human M. bovis cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2002–2014. We identified 357 cases and observed increased annual case numbers (from 17 to 35) and rates. Most patients were >65 years of age and born in the United Kingdom. The median age of UK-born patients decreased over time. For 74% of patients, exposure to risk factors accounting for M. bovis acquisition, most frequently consumption of unpasteurized milk, was known. Despite the small increase in case numbers and reduction in patient age, M. bovis infection of humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland remains rare.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual number and incidence rate (no. cases/100,000 population) of notified Mycobacterium bovis cases by patient place of birth, England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002–2014. Unknown place of birth includes notifications with an unknown place of birth and cases that have not been notified.
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Figure 1: Annual number and incidence rate (no. cases/100,000 population) of notified Mycobacterium bovis cases by patient place of birth, England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002–2014. Unknown place of birth includes notifications with an unknown place of birth and cases that have not been notified.

Mentions: For 2002–2014, we identified 357 culture-confirmed cases of M. bovis disease in humans. During this time, the proportion of all culture-confirmed TB cases speciated as M. bovis increased from 0.4% to 0.9% (p<0.001). Annual case numbers ranged from 17 in 2002 to 35 in 2014, and the incidence rate fluctuated between 0.03 and 0.06 cases/100,000 population (Figure 1); the incidence rate ratio per year was 1.04 (95% CI 1.01–1.07). Overall, 92.2% (329/357) of M. bovis cases were notified to ETS; since 2011, all identified cases have been notified.


Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis Disease in Humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002 – 2014
Annual number and incidence rate (no. cases/100,000 population) of notified Mycobacterium bovis cases by patient place of birth, England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002–2014. Unknown place of birth includes notifications with an unknown place of birth and cases that have not been notified.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382737&req=5

Figure 1: Annual number and incidence rate (no. cases/100,000 population) of notified Mycobacterium bovis cases by patient place of birth, England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002–2014. Unknown place of birth includes notifications with an unknown place of birth and cases that have not been notified.
Mentions: For 2002–2014, we identified 357 culture-confirmed cases of M. bovis disease in humans. During this time, the proportion of all culture-confirmed TB cases speciated as M. bovis increased from 0.4% to 0.9% (p<0.001). Annual case numbers ranged from 17 in 2002 to 35 in 2014, and the incidence rate fluctuated between 0.03 and 0.06 cases/100,000 population (Figure 1); the incidence rate ratio per year was 1.04 (95% CI 1.01–1.07). Overall, 92.2% (329/357) of M. bovis cases were notified to ETS; since 2011, all identified cases have been notified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Despite control efforts, Mycobacterium bovis incidence among cattle remains high in parts of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, attracting political and public health interest in potential spread from animals to humans. To determine incidence among humans and to identify associated factors, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of human M. bovis cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2002&ndash;2014. We identified 357 cases and observed increased annual case numbers (from 17 to 35) and rates. Most patients were &gt;65 years of age and born in the United Kingdom. The median age of UK-born patients decreased over time. For 74% of patients, exposure to risk factors accounting for M. bovis acquisition, most frequently consumption of unpasteurized milk, was known. Despite the small increase in case numbers and reduction in patient age, M. bovis infection of humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland remains rare.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus