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Potential application of an Aspergillus strain in a pilot biofilter for benzene biodegradation

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A biofilter with fungus was developed for efficient degradation of benzene, which can overcome the potential risk of leakage commonly found in such services. Results indicated that the optimum parameter values were temperature 40 °C, pH 6, and 500 mg L−1 of the initial benzene concentration. Besides, the empty bed residence time and inlet load range of biofilter were set to 20 s and 21.23–169.84 g m−3 h−1 respectively. Under these conditions, this biofilter can obtain the maximum removal efficiency of more than 90%, the eliminating capacity could be up to 151.67 g m−3 h−1. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate three filler materials for packing fungus biofilm. This is the first study introducing an Aspergillus strain for benzene removal and these results highlight that the development of this biofilter has the potential scaling-up application as gas-processing of industrial wastes.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of inlet load and EBRT on benzene removal.
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f5: Effect of inlet load and EBRT on benzene removal.

Mentions: According to the above analysis, biofilter with CCAC was selected as the focus of further investigation. Under the same EBRT (20 s), the effect of biological benzene removal depends on the quantity and activity of HD-5 in CCAC and biofilm. Figure 5 indicates all RE of different EBRT reach the summit when the inlet load was 42.46 g m−3 h−1. It might be attributed to the relatively few of HD-5 when the inlet load was 21.23 g m−3 h−1, and the quantity of HD-5 was increased with the inlet load (Fig. 6). Meanwhile the obstacle of mass transfer within the biofilm was triggered by the low diffusive fluxes of benzene, and the biofilm was not fully utilized43.


Potential application of an Aspergillus strain in a pilot biofilter for benzene biodegradation
Effect of inlet load and EBRT on benzene removal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382587&req=5

f5: Effect of inlet load and EBRT on benzene removal.
Mentions: According to the above analysis, biofilter with CCAC was selected as the focus of further investigation. Under the same EBRT (20 s), the effect of biological benzene removal depends on the quantity and activity of HD-5 in CCAC and biofilm. Figure 5 indicates all RE of different EBRT reach the summit when the inlet load was 42.46 g m−3 h−1. It might be attributed to the relatively few of HD-5 when the inlet load was 21.23 g m−3 h−1, and the quantity of HD-5 was increased with the inlet load (Fig. 6). Meanwhile the obstacle of mass transfer within the biofilm was triggered by the low diffusive fluxes of benzene, and the biofilm was not fully utilized43.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A biofilter with fungus was developed for efficient degradation of benzene, which can overcome the potential risk of leakage commonly found in such services. Results indicated that the optimum parameter values were temperature 40 °C, pH 6, and 500 mg L−1 of the initial benzene concentration. Besides, the empty bed residence time and inlet load range of biofilter were set to 20 s and 21.23–169.84 g m−3 h−1 respectively. Under these conditions, this biofilter can obtain the maximum removal efficiency of more than 90%, the eliminating capacity could be up to 151.67 g m−3 h−1. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate three filler materials for packing fungus biofilm. This is the first study introducing an Aspergillus strain for benzene removal and these results highlight that the development of this biofilter has the potential scaling-up application as gas-processing of industrial wastes.

No MeSH data available.