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High hydrostatic pressure specifically affects molecular dynamics and shape of low-density lipoprotein particles

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ABSTRACT

Lipid composition of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its physicochemical characteristics are relevant for proper functioning of lipid transport in the blood circulation. To explore dynamical and structural features of LDL particles with either a normal or a triglyceride-rich lipid composition we combined coherent and incoherent neutron scattering methods. The investigations were carried out under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), which is a versatile tool to study the physicochemical behavior of biomolecules in solution at a molecular level. Within both neutron techniques we applied HHP to probe the shape and degree of freedom of the possible motions (within the time windows of 15 and 100 ps) and consequently the flexibility of LDL particles. We found that HHP does not change the types of motion in LDL, but influences the portion of motions participating. Contrary to our assumption that lipoprotein particles, like membranes, are highly sensitive to pressure we determined that LDL copes surprisingly well with high pressure conditions, although the lipid composition, particularly the triglyceride content of the particles, impacts the molecular dynamics and shape arrangement of LDL under pressure.

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Schematic representation of the fitted ellipsoidal model with the three axes R1, R2 and R3 (a). Fitted radii of a triaxial ellipsoid extracted from the SANS curves. The continuous lines correspond to N-LDL, the dashed lines to TG-LDL (b).
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f6: Schematic representation of the fitted ellipsoidal model with the three axes R1, R2 and R3 (a). Fitted radii of a triaxial ellipsoid extracted from the SANS curves. The continuous lines correspond to N-LDL, the dashed lines to TG-LDL (b).

Mentions: To fit the overall structure of LDL particles we used an ellipsoidal model to extract the radius of gyration and the three radii of the ellipsoid (R1-R3) as presented in Fig. 6a. The fit indicates that the shape of N-LDL at low pressure is slightly more elongated compared to the shape of TG-LDL (see Fig. 6b and ESI Table S4). Still, the difference in the overall structure was rather small at low pressure. This is in good agreement with the QENS data, where the difference in the dynamics was also negligible at low pressure.


High hydrostatic pressure specifically affects molecular dynamics and shape of low-density lipoprotein particles
Schematic representation of the fitted ellipsoidal model with the three axes R1, R2 and R3 (a). Fitted radii of a triaxial ellipsoid extracted from the SANS curves. The continuous lines correspond to N-LDL, the dashed lines to TG-LDL (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382586&req=5

f6: Schematic representation of the fitted ellipsoidal model with the three axes R1, R2 and R3 (a). Fitted radii of a triaxial ellipsoid extracted from the SANS curves. The continuous lines correspond to N-LDL, the dashed lines to TG-LDL (b).
Mentions: To fit the overall structure of LDL particles we used an ellipsoidal model to extract the radius of gyration and the three radii of the ellipsoid (R1-R3) as presented in Fig. 6a. The fit indicates that the shape of N-LDL at low pressure is slightly more elongated compared to the shape of TG-LDL (see Fig. 6b and ESI Table S4). Still, the difference in the overall structure was rather small at low pressure. This is in good agreement with the QENS data, where the difference in the dynamics was also negligible at low pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Lipid composition of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its physicochemical characteristics are relevant for proper functioning of lipid transport in the blood circulation. To explore dynamical and structural features of LDL particles with either a normal or a triglyceride-rich lipid composition we combined coherent and incoherent neutron scattering methods. The investigations were carried out under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), which is a versatile tool to study the physicochemical behavior of biomolecules in solution at a molecular level. Within both neutron techniques we applied HHP to probe the shape and degree of freedom of the possible motions (within the time windows of 15 and 100 ps) and consequently the flexibility of LDL particles. We found that HHP does not change the types of motion in LDL, but influences the portion of motions participating. Contrary to our assumption that lipoprotein particles, like membranes, are highly sensitive to pressure we determined that LDL copes surprisingly well with high pressure conditions, although the lipid composition, particularly the triglyceride content of the particles, impacts the molecular dynamics and shape arrangement of LDL under pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus