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Autogenic succession and deterministic recovery following disturbance in soil bacterial communities

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The response of bacterial communities to environmental change may affect local to global nutrient cycles. However the dynamics of these communities following disturbance are poorly understood, given that they are often evaluated over macro-ecological time scales and end-point measurements. In order to understand the successional trajectory of soil bacterial communities following disturbances and the mechanisms controlling these dynamics at a scale relevant for these organisms, we subjected soil microcosms to a heat disturbance and followed the community composition of active bacteria over 50 days. The disturbance imposed a strong selective pressure that persisted for up to 10 days, after which the importance of stochastic processes increased. Three successional stages were detected: a primary response in which surviving taxa increased in abundance; a secondary response phase during which community dynamics slowed down, and a stability phase (after 29 days), during which the community tended towards its original composition. Phylogenetic turnover patterns indicated that the community experienced stronger deterministic selection during recovery. Thus, soil bacterial communities, despite their extreme diversity and functional redundancy, respond to disturbances like many macro-ecological systems and exhibit path-dependent, autogenic dynamics during secondary succession. These results highlight the role of autogenic factors and successional dynamics in microbial recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Bacterial activity rate during secondary succession.Average community activity is calculated as the ratio of cDNA:DNA 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. A lowess fit of the data is shown in black, with the standard error as grey shading. Separate cDNA and DNA measurements are available in Supplementary Information, S9.
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f1: Bacterial activity rate during secondary succession.Average community activity is calculated as the ratio of cDNA:DNA 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. A lowess fit of the data is shown in black, with the standard error as grey shading. Separate cDNA and DNA measurements are available in Supplementary Information, S9.

Mentions: The community-wide per-cell activity rate, calculated as the ratio of cDNA/DNA copies of the 16S rRNA gene, declined moderately following disturbance (one-tailed t-test, p = 0.054, 0.027, 0.057 for the comparison between values for pre-disturbance and T1, T4, and T10, respectively, Fig. 1), but reached pre-disturbance levels by T18 (one tailed t-test, p = 0.32) and remained indistinguishable from undisturbed soils thereafter (Supplementary Information, S1).


Autogenic succession and deterministic recovery following disturbance in soil bacterial communities
Bacterial activity rate during secondary succession.Average community activity is calculated as the ratio of cDNA:DNA 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. A lowess fit of the data is shown in black, with the standard error as grey shading. Separate cDNA and DNA measurements are available in Supplementary Information, S9.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382530&req=5

f1: Bacterial activity rate during secondary succession.Average community activity is calculated as the ratio of cDNA:DNA 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. A lowess fit of the data is shown in black, with the standard error as grey shading. Separate cDNA and DNA measurements are available in Supplementary Information, S9.
Mentions: The community-wide per-cell activity rate, calculated as the ratio of cDNA/DNA copies of the 16S rRNA gene, declined moderately following disturbance (one-tailed t-test, p = 0.054, 0.027, 0.057 for the comparison between values for pre-disturbance and T1, T4, and T10, respectively, Fig. 1), but reached pre-disturbance levels by T18 (one tailed t-test, p = 0.32) and remained indistinguishable from undisturbed soils thereafter (Supplementary Information, S1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The response of bacterial communities to environmental change may affect local to global nutrient cycles. However the dynamics of these communities following disturbance are poorly understood, given that they are often evaluated over macro-ecological time scales and end-point measurements. In order to understand the successional trajectory of soil bacterial communities following disturbances and the mechanisms controlling these dynamics at a scale relevant for these organisms, we subjected soil microcosms to a heat disturbance and followed the community composition of active bacteria over 50 days. The disturbance imposed a strong selective pressure that persisted for up to 10 days, after which the importance of stochastic processes increased. Three successional stages were detected: a primary response in which surviving taxa increased in abundance; a secondary response phase during which community dynamics slowed down, and a stability phase (after 29 days), during which the community tended towards its original composition. Phylogenetic turnover patterns indicated that the community experienced stronger deterministic selection during recovery. Thus, soil bacterial communities, despite their extreme diversity and functional redundancy, respond to disturbances like many macro-ecological systems and exhibit path-dependent, autogenic dynamics during secondary succession. These results highlight the role of autogenic factors and successional dynamics in microbial recovery.

No MeSH data available.