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Supplemental invasion of Salmonella from the perspective of Salmonella enterica serovars Kentucky and Typhimurium

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Critical to the development of Salmonellosis in humans is the interaction of the bacterium with the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract. Traditional scientific reasoning held type III secretion system (T3SS) as the virulence factor responsible for bacterial invasion. In this study, field-isolated Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky and a known human pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were mutated and evaluated for the invasion of human colorectal adenocarcinoma epithelial cells.

Results: S. enterica serovar Kentucky was shown to actively invade a eukaryotic monolayer, though at a rate that was significantly lower than Typhimurium. Additionally, strains mutated for T3SS formation were less invasive than the wild-type strains, but the decrease in invasion was not significant in Kentucky.

Conclusions: Strains mutated for T3SS formation were able to initiate invasion of the eukaryotic monolayer to varying degrees based on strain, In the case of Kentucky, the mutated strain initiated invasion at a level that was not significantly different from the wild-type strain. A different result was observed for Typhimurium as the mutation significantly lowered the rate of invasion in comparison to the wild-type strain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fit plot for colony forming units (CFU)/mL. At each time point, cultures were diluted either 10−3 or 10−5 and 10−6 in 0.01 M PBS, and 25 μL of bacteria suspension were spread on LB agar. Colony forming units (CFU) from each dilution were enumerated and adjusted to CFU/mL. CFU/mL along the y-axis was plotted as a function of OD600 on the x-axis in XY scatter plot to predict CFU relative to OD600. The regression equations, R-squared value, and P-value were determined for each serotype and strain
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Fig2: Fit plot for colony forming units (CFU)/mL. At each time point, cultures were diluted either 10−3 or 10−5 and 10−6 in 0.01 M PBS, and 25 μL of bacteria suspension were spread on LB agar. Colony forming units (CFU) from each dilution were enumerated and adjusted to CFU/mL. CFU/mL along the y-axis was plotted as a function of OD600 on the x-axis in XY scatter plot to predict CFU relative to OD600. The regression equations, R-squared value, and P-value were determined for each serotype and strain

Mentions: Further growth analysis was conducted to confirm viable bacteria number relative to OD600 values for each serotype and strain. At time point 0 h, an aliquot of each culture was diluted 10−3 in 0.01 M PBS, and at time points 6 h and 12 h, cultures were diluted 10−5 and 10−6 in 0.01 M PBS, and 25 μL were spread on LB agar. Colony forming units were counted and adjusted to CFU/mL from four technical replicates for each serotype and strain at 0 h, 6 h, and 12 h. For all serotypes and strains, the model used for linear regression analysis indicated a significant portion of the variation in CFU/mL was due to OD600. The statistical analysis, including regression equation, R-squared value, P-value, for each serotype and strain follows (Fig. 2).Fig. 2


Supplemental invasion of Salmonella from the perspective of Salmonella enterica serovars Kentucky and Typhimurium
Fit plot for colony forming units (CFU)/mL. At each time point, cultures were diluted either 10−3 or 10−5 and 10−6 in 0.01 M PBS, and 25 μL of bacteria suspension were spread on LB agar. Colony forming units (CFU) from each dilution were enumerated and adjusted to CFU/mL. CFU/mL along the y-axis was plotted as a function of OD600 on the x-axis in XY scatter plot to predict CFU relative to OD600. The regression equations, R-squared value, and P-value were determined for each serotype and strain
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382418&req=5

Fig2: Fit plot for colony forming units (CFU)/mL. At each time point, cultures were diluted either 10−3 or 10−5 and 10−6 in 0.01 M PBS, and 25 μL of bacteria suspension were spread on LB agar. Colony forming units (CFU) from each dilution were enumerated and adjusted to CFU/mL. CFU/mL along the y-axis was plotted as a function of OD600 on the x-axis in XY scatter plot to predict CFU relative to OD600. The regression equations, R-squared value, and P-value were determined for each serotype and strain
Mentions: Further growth analysis was conducted to confirm viable bacteria number relative to OD600 values for each serotype and strain. At time point 0 h, an aliquot of each culture was diluted 10−3 in 0.01 M PBS, and at time points 6 h and 12 h, cultures were diluted 10−5 and 10−6 in 0.01 M PBS, and 25 μL were spread on LB agar. Colony forming units were counted and adjusted to CFU/mL from four technical replicates for each serotype and strain at 0 h, 6 h, and 12 h. For all serotypes and strains, the model used for linear regression analysis indicated a significant portion of the variation in CFU/mL was due to OD600. The statistical analysis, including regression equation, R-squared value, P-value, for each serotype and strain follows (Fig. 2).Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Critical to the development of Salmonellosis in humans is the interaction of the bacterium with the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract. Traditional scientific reasoning held type III secretion system (T3SS) as the virulence factor responsible for bacterial invasion. In this study, field-isolated Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky and a known human pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were mutated and evaluated for the invasion of human colorectal adenocarcinoma epithelial cells.

Results: S. enterica serovar Kentucky was shown to actively invade a eukaryotic monolayer, though at a rate that was significantly lower than Typhimurium. Additionally, strains mutated for T3SS formation were less invasive than the wild-type strains, but the decrease in invasion was not significant in Kentucky.

Conclusions: Strains mutated for T3SS formation were able to initiate invasion of the eukaryotic monolayer to varying degrees based on strain, In the case of Kentucky, the mutated strain initiated invasion at a level that was not significantly different from the wild-type strain. A different result was observed for Typhimurium as the mutation significantly lowered the rate of invasion in comparison to the wild-type strain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus