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Behaviour of fattening pigs fed with liquid feed and dry feed

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Facilities for fattening pigs offer limited possibilities for exploration and wet feeding systems, where the pigs drink the food instead of eating it, have expanded on behalf of dry feeding systems. As little has been made to evaluate liquid feeding from the point of view of the pigs, the aims of this study were to compare behaviour in general and behaviour at feeding in particular of fatteners offered dry or wet feed. The study was carried out in an integrated herd with age segregated rearing of pigs and access to both feeding systems in the fattening units. Apart from the feeding system, the pens were identical and they were managed by the same staff. Pigs were allocated to the fattening units at 20 kg body weight and their behaviour was studied through web cameras during day hours (07.00 to 19.00).

Results: Pigs performed well in both systems, but differed in behaviour. Fattening pigs offered dry feed spent longer time (P < 0.001) eating at every feeding occasion. They also expressed fewer regroupings during the first week (P < 0.001) when the social rank not yet was established. Pigs fed liquid feed regrouped during the effective eating time, while pigs fed dry feed regrouped when the first pig already had left the through which rather reflected seeking for leftover feed. Restlessness was rarely recorded before feeding, but rather frequently afterwards. During week 5–9 restlessness was more frequently recorded among pigs offered wet feed. Pigs offered liquid feed expressed unwanted behaviour in terms of belly-nosing, and nibbling of ear or tail to a somewhat higher extent than pigs offered dry feed. In both systems the pigs were occupying themselves with straw when offered, but only as long as they regarded it as new, i.e., for around 45 min following each provision.

Conclusions: Pigs performed equivalent in both systems, but from an animal welfare view we recommend dry feed to growing pigs and suggest that liquid feed systems ought to be reserved for systems using alternative feed supplies like whey or other liquid leftovers from the food industry.

No MeSH data available.


Change of position during the total eating time. The total number of changes in position of pigs during the morning feeding throughout the rearing period. Open symbols represent the wet feeding system and filled symbols represent the dry feeding system. It should be noted that regroupings generally took place earlier after onset of feeding in the wet feeding system than in the dry feeding system. The mean total eating time (i.e., minutes from start until all pigs had left the trough) over the rearing period was 6.7 ± 2.3 min for pigs in the wet foddering system, and 11.6 ± 2.4 min in the dry foddering system
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Fig2: Change of position during the total eating time. The total number of changes in position of pigs during the morning feeding throughout the rearing period. Open symbols represent the wet feeding system and filled symbols represent the dry feeding system. It should be noted that regroupings generally took place earlier after onset of feeding in the wet feeding system than in the dry feeding system. The mean total eating time (i.e., minutes from start until all pigs had left the trough) over the rearing period was 6.7 ± 2.3 min for pigs in the wet foddering system, and 11.6 ± 2.4 min in the dry foddering system

Mentions: The mean effective eating time per feeding, i.e., when first pig leaved the trough, was 3.6 ± 1.3 min in the wet feeding system compared to 8.6 ± 2.7 min in the dry system (P < 0.001, t-test) over the rearing period of 13 weeks (Fig. 1). In the wet feeding system, an extensive exchange of positions at the trough was denoted before all pigs had left the trough (Fig. 2). During the total eating time, an exchange of position was on average seen every 15.6 ± 5.5 s in the wet and every 23.5 ± 9.6 s in the dry feeding system, respectively (P < 0.001, t-test). Figure 1 shows the incidence of aggressions between pigs when eating. These aggressions generally took place early during eating in the wet feeding system, while the number of aggressions during eating increased with time in the dry feeding system.Fig. 1


Behaviour of fattening pigs fed with liquid feed and dry feed
Change of position during the total eating time. The total number of changes in position of pigs during the morning feeding throughout the rearing period. Open symbols represent the wet feeding system and filled symbols represent the dry feeding system. It should be noted that regroupings generally took place earlier after onset of feeding in the wet feeding system than in the dry feeding system. The mean total eating time (i.e., minutes from start until all pigs had left the trough) over the rearing period was 6.7 ± 2.3 min for pigs in the wet foddering system, and 11.6 ± 2.4 min in the dry foddering system
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382388&req=5

Fig2: Change of position during the total eating time. The total number of changes in position of pigs during the morning feeding throughout the rearing period. Open symbols represent the wet feeding system and filled symbols represent the dry feeding system. It should be noted that regroupings generally took place earlier after onset of feeding in the wet feeding system than in the dry feeding system. The mean total eating time (i.e., minutes from start until all pigs had left the trough) over the rearing period was 6.7 ± 2.3 min for pigs in the wet foddering system, and 11.6 ± 2.4 min in the dry foddering system
Mentions: The mean effective eating time per feeding, i.e., when first pig leaved the trough, was 3.6 ± 1.3 min in the wet feeding system compared to 8.6 ± 2.7 min in the dry system (P < 0.001, t-test) over the rearing period of 13 weeks (Fig. 1). In the wet feeding system, an extensive exchange of positions at the trough was denoted before all pigs had left the trough (Fig. 2). During the total eating time, an exchange of position was on average seen every 15.6 ± 5.5 s in the wet and every 23.5 ± 9.6 s in the dry feeding system, respectively (P < 0.001, t-test). Figure 1 shows the incidence of aggressions between pigs when eating. These aggressions generally took place early during eating in the wet feeding system, while the number of aggressions during eating increased with time in the dry feeding system.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Facilities for fattening pigs offer limited possibilities for exploration and wet feeding systems, where the pigs drink the food instead of eating it, have expanded on behalf of dry feeding systems. As little has been made to evaluate liquid feeding from the point of view of the pigs, the aims of this study were to compare behaviour in general and behaviour at feeding in particular of fatteners offered dry or wet feed. The study was carried out in an integrated herd with age segregated rearing of pigs and access to both feeding systems in the fattening units. Apart from the feeding system, the pens were identical and they were managed by the same staff. Pigs were allocated to the fattening units at 20&nbsp;kg body weight and their behaviour was studied through web cameras during day hours (07.00 to 19.00).

Results: Pigs performed well in both systems, but differed in behaviour. Fattening pigs offered dry feed spent longer time (P&thinsp;&lt;&thinsp;0.001) eating at every feeding occasion. They also expressed fewer regroupings during the first week (P&thinsp;&lt;&thinsp;0.001) when the social rank not yet was established. Pigs fed liquid feed regrouped during the effective eating time, while pigs fed dry feed regrouped when the first pig already had left the through which rather reflected seeking for leftover feed. Restlessness was rarely recorded before feeding, but rather frequently afterwards. During week 5&ndash;9 restlessness was more frequently recorded among pigs offered wet feed. Pigs offered liquid feed expressed unwanted behaviour in terms of belly-nosing, and nibbling of ear or tail to a somewhat higher extent than pigs offered dry feed. In both systems the pigs were occupying themselves with straw when offered, but only as long as they regarded it as new, i.e., for around 45&nbsp;min following each provision.

Conclusions: Pigs performed equivalent in both systems, but from an animal welfare view we recommend dry feed to growing pigs and suggest that liquid feed systems ought to be reserved for systems using alternative feed supplies like whey or other liquid leftovers from the food industry.

No MeSH data available.