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Paediatric pelvic fractures: how do they differ from adults?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this article was to review the incidence, presentation, treatment and complications of paediatric pelvic fractures of children who were admitted to our level 1 trauma centre and to compare them with our data from adult pelvic fracture patients.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of all children with pelvic fractures who were managed at our institution between January 1993 and December 2013 and compared the data with our database on pelvic fractures in adults during the period 2007 to 2012.

Results: We identified 51 children and 268 adults with pelvic fractures. The median age of the paediatric patients was 11 years. Children were significantly more involved in traffic accidents than adults (p < 0.001). Adults had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) (31 vs 24.5; p < 0.03) and were significantly more often haemodynamically unstable (p < 0.01). Adults had a type C fracture more often, while children had a type B fracture (p < 0.001). Associated injuries were seen in both groups; however, thoracic injuries were significantly higher in adults (p < 0.01) and injuries to the extremities were higher in children (p < 0.01). Adults were significantly more often treated with open reduction and internal fixation (p < 0.001). Mortality in both groups, however, did not differ (6% vs 8%).

Conclusion: Paediatric pelvic fractures are rare. They differ from adult pelvic fractures in presentation, associated injuries and management. Mortality, however, is substantial and does not differ from the adult population. Mortality is often due to concomitant injuries and not to exsanguination from the pelvic fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Post-operative radiograph with bilateral plate osteosynthesis.
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Figure 3: Post-operative radiograph with bilateral plate osteosynthesis.


Paediatric pelvic fractures: how do they differ from adults?
Post-operative radiograph with bilateral plate osteosynthesis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5382336&req=5

Figure 3: Post-operative radiograph with bilateral plate osteosynthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this article was to review the incidence, presentation, treatment and complications of paediatric pelvic fractures of children who were admitted to our level 1 trauma centre and to compare them with our data from adult pelvic fracture patients.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of all children with pelvic fractures who were managed at our institution between January 1993 and December 2013 and compared the data with our database on pelvic fractures in adults during the period 2007 to 2012.

Results: We identified 51 children and 268 adults with pelvic fractures. The median age of the paediatric patients was 11 years. Children were significantly more involved in traffic accidents than adults (p < 0.001). Adults had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) (31 vs 24.5; p < 0.03) and were significantly more often haemodynamically unstable (p < 0.01). Adults had a type C fracture more often, while children had a type B fracture (p < 0.001). Associated injuries were seen in both groups; however, thoracic injuries were significantly higher in adults (p < 0.01) and injuries to the extremities were higher in children (p < 0.01). Adults were significantly more often treated with open reduction and internal fixation (p < 0.001). Mortality in both groups, however, did not differ (6% vs 8%).

Conclusion: Paediatric pelvic fractures are rare. They differ from adult pelvic fractures in presentation, associated injuries and management. Mortality, however, is substantial and does not differ from the adult population. Mortality is often due to concomitant injuries and not to exsanguination from the pelvic fracture.

No MeSH data available.