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Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †

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ABSTRACT

Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.

No MeSH data available.


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Schematic setup of differential configuration of FBG sensor at 45° angle relative to the shaft axis.
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sensors-17-00443-f026: Schematic setup of differential configuration of FBG sensor at 45° angle relative to the shaft axis.

Mentions: There is also a group of rotation/twist/torsion sensors that utilize conventional approaches for twist/torsion measurements on larger (measurement) bodies like cylinders or solid roads. These approaches have been used for decades to build high-quality torque and torsion sensors using conventional strain gauges. In these configurations, conventional fiber-optic strain sensors (mostly FBGs) are applied to measure directly the shear stress at the surface of the measurement body, while this measured stress is then correlated to twist/rotation or torque. Differential configurations of FBGs or other fiber-optic strain sensors, at a 45° angle relative to the shaft axis (Figure 26) are, thus, commonly employed to enhance the sensitivity and achieve efficient temperature compensation as, for example, shown in [106,107,108,109,110,111]. Similar results can be achieved by specially designed measurements bodies as, for example, reported in [112]. Another interesting approach is a distributed torsion sensor employing cascaded coaxial cable Faby-Perot interferometers mounted on a shaft, where the authors have implemented weak reflectors on a coaxial cable, thus forming between any two consecutive reflectors a Fabry-Perot cavity [113]. Torsion is measured indirectly from the measured axial strain due to applied torsion to the shaft.


Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †
Schematic setup of differential configuration of FBG sensor at 45° angle relative to the shaft axis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5375729&req=5

sensors-17-00443-f026: Schematic setup of differential configuration of FBG sensor at 45° angle relative to the shaft axis.
Mentions: There is also a group of rotation/twist/torsion sensors that utilize conventional approaches for twist/torsion measurements on larger (measurement) bodies like cylinders or solid roads. These approaches have been used for decades to build high-quality torque and torsion sensors using conventional strain gauges. In these configurations, conventional fiber-optic strain sensors (mostly FBGs) are applied to measure directly the shear stress at the surface of the measurement body, while this measured stress is then correlated to twist/rotation or torque. Differential configurations of FBGs or other fiber-optic strain sensors, at a 45° angle relative to the shaft axis (Figure 26) are, thus, commonly employed to enhance the sensitivity and achieve efficient temperature compensation as, for example, shown in [106,107,108,109,110,111]. Similar results can be achieved by specially designed measurements bodies as, for example, reported in [112]. Another interesting approach is a distributed torsion sensor employing cascaded coaxial cable Faby-Perot interferometers mounted on a shaft, where the authors have implemented weak reflectors on a coaxial cable, thus forming between any two consecutive reflectors a Fabry-Perot cavity [113]. Torsion is measured indirectly from the measured axial strain due to applied torsion to the shaft.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus