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Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †

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ABSTRACT

Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.

No MeSH data available.


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Mechanically induced LPFBG (M-LPFBG) twist/torsion test setup.
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sensors-17-00443-f008: Mechanically induced LPFBG (M-LPFBG) twist/torsion test setup.

Mentions: Mechanically induced LPFBGs (MLPFBGs) have attracted considerable interest in the past. When using this approach, the sensing fiber is squeezed in-between two corrugated plates to impose micro-bending onto the fiber [54,55]. MLPFBG twist/torsion based sensors are simple, flexible in their fabrication, and have good potential for cost-efficient design (Figure 8). They are also relatively easy to study/investigate. Mechanically induced/fabricated MLPFBG’s usually possess a fair amount of linear birefringence, which is induced by the corrugated plates. In some cases, this can lead to the sufficient degeneracy of modes to obtain two linearly polarized solutions. Thus, coupling to the cladding modes in the MLPFBGs can become polarization dependent as, for example, demonstrated in [56] by Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL) and Differential Group Delay (DGD) measurements. Twist/rotation sensors using an MLPFBG sensor can also be built by using a variety of different fibers as, for example, step-index SM fibers [37], dispersion shifted fibers [57], photonic crystal fibers [58] and doped SM fibers [40]. The use of different fiber types requires proper tailoring of micro-bending deformer and mechanical setup of each fiber type.


Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †
Mechanically induced LPFBG (M-LPFBG) twist/torsion test setup.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5375729&req=5

sensors-17-00443-f008: Mechanically induced LPFBG (M-LPFBG) twist/torsion test setup.
Mentions: Mechanically induced LPFBGs (MLPFBGs) have attracted considerable interest in the past. When using this approach, the sensing fiber is squeezed in-between two corrugated plates to impose micro-bending onto the fiber [54,55]. MLPFBG twist/torsion based sensors are simple, flexible in their fabrication, and have good potential for cost-efficient design (Figure 8). They are also relatively easy to study/investigate. Mechanically induced/fabricated MLPFBG’s usually possess a fair amount of linear birefringence, which is induced by the corrugated plates. In some cases, this can lead to the sufficient degeneracy of modes to obtain two linearly polarized solutions. Thus, coupling to the cladding modes in the MLPFBGs can become polarization dependent as, for example, demonstrated in [56] by Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL) and Differential Group Delay (DGD) measurements. Twist/rotation sensors using an MLPFBG sensor can also be built by using a variety of different fibers as, for example, step-index SM fibers [37], dispersion shifted fibers [57], photonic crystal fibers [58] and doped SM fibers [40]. The use of different fiber types requires proper tailoring of micro-bending deformer and mechanical setup of each fiber type.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus