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Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †

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ABSTRACT

Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.

No MeSH data available.


Twist sensor employing a loop mirror configuration with an output port probe.
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sensors-17-00443-f005: Twist sensor employing a loop mirror configuration with an output port probe.

Mentions: While Signac interferometers/loop mirrors present a very convenient and versatile way for twist/rotation sensing, perhaps their main disadvantage comes from the need to access the sensor fiber from both sides and locate the entire fiber loop at the measurement site. This requirement might, importantly, compromise the practicality of Sagnac sensor setup, as it increases the size and complicates the sensor’s packing. A possible solution to overcome this limitation was presented in [21], where an additional coupler was inserted into the loop mirror to obtain a “linear” twist/rotation sensor configuration [22] using only one lead-in fiber (Figure 5). Another approach described in [23] attempted to make the entire Sagnac loop sensor more practical by considerable miniaturization of its size. In this instance, the fiber’s loop coupler was employed simultaneously as a coupler and birefringent sensing fiber section.


Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †
Twist sensor employing a loop mirror configuration with an output port probe.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5375729&req=5

sensors-17-00443-f005: Twist sensor employing a loop mirror configuration with an output port probe.
Mentions: While Signac interferometers/loop mirrors present a very convenient and versatile way for twist/rotation sensing, perhaps their main disadvantage comes from the need to access the sensor fiber from both sides and locate the entire fiber loop at the measurement site. This requirement might, importantly, compromise the practicality of Sagnac sensor setup, as it increases the size and complicates the sensor’s packing. A possible solution to overcome this limitation was presented in [21], where an additional coupler was inserted into the loop mirror to obtain a “linear” twist/rotation sensor configuration [22] using only one lead-in fiber (Figure 5). Another approach described in [23] attempted to make the entire Sagnac loop sensor more practical by considerable miniaturization of its size. In this instance, the fiber’s loop coupler was employed simultaneously as a coupler and birefringent sensing fiber section.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.

No MeSH data available.