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ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

No MeSH data available.


Results of the USE questionnaire according to the four categories: satisfaction, perceived usefulness, ease of use and ease of learning.
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sensors-17-00438-f014: Results of the USE questionnaire according to the four categories: satisfaction, perceived usefulness, ease of use and ease of learning.

Mentions: Figure 14 shows the results of the USE questionnaire according to the four categories. The questionnaire points out a general positive acceptance of the toolkit. The one-sample Wilcoxon Signed-rank test shows that Likert scores were significantly different (higher) from a neutral value of 3 for all the criteria of the USE approach: satisfaction (M = 3.554, SD = 1.145, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [3.5, 4.5]), perceived usefulness (M = 3.455, SD = 1.328, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [3.0, 4.0]), ease of use (M = 3.767, SD = 1.148, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [4.0, 4.5]), ease of learning (M = 4.359, SD = 0.804, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [4.5, 5.0]).


ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction
Results of the USE questionnaire according to the four categories: satisfaction, perceived usefulness, ease of use and ease of learning.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5375724&req=5

sensors-17-00438-f014: Results of the USE questionnaire according to the four categories: satisfaction, perceived usefulness, ease of use and ease of learning.
Mentions: Figure 14 shows the results of the USE questionnaire according to the four categories. The questionnaire points out a general positive acceptance of the toolkit. The one-sample Wilcoxon Signed-rank test shows that Likert scores were significantly different (higher) from a neutral value of 3 for all the criteria of the USE approach: satisfaction (M = 3.554, SD = 1.145, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [3.5, 4.5]), perceived usefulness (M = 3.455, SD = 1.328, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [3.0, 4.0]), ease of use (M = 3.767, SD = 1.148, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [4.0, 4.5]), ease of learning (M = 4.359, SD = 0.804, ρ < 0.05, 95% CI [4.5, 5.0]).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

No MeSH data available.