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ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

No MeSH data available.


An example of the JavaScript code on the server (on the right) that is generated by parsing the XML definition of a proximity sensor (on the left).
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sensors-17-00438-f008: An example of the JavaScript code on the server (on the right) that is generated by parsing the XML definition of a proximity sensor (on the left).

Mentions: The interface of the authoring tool provides a button to run and test the current ecosystem configuration, which will launch an instance of the Ecosystem Server. All the XML-based descriptions are parsed by the Ecosystem Code Generator, which creates the logic of the Ecosystem Server in terms of data structures that hold the description of interactive objects, their interactions and network-agnostic data routing. As an example, once the XML description in Figure 8, on the left, is parsed, the JavaScript code in the same Figure, on the right, is generated that allows the Ecosystem Server to manage events from the Entity that holds such sensor; in this case it will turn on the LED on another entity if the distance is lesser than 10 cm. The Ecosystem Code Generator also generates the source code source code for the user interface of display-enabled objects (a HTML5-CSS-JavaScript webpage), which can be executed by scanning an auto-generated QR-Code. This avoids writing the URL of the generated interface on the target device.


ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction
An example of the JavaScript code on the server (on the right) that is generated by parsing the XML definition of a proximity sensor (on the left).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5375724&req=5

sensors-17-00438-f008: An example of the JavaScript code on the server (on the right) that is generated by parsing the XML definition of a proximity sensor (on the left).
Mentions: The interface of the authoring tool provides a button to run and test the current ecosystem configuration, which will launch an instance of the Ecosystem Server. All the XML-based descriptions are parsed by the Ecosystem Code Generator, which creates the logic of the Ecosystem Server in terms of data structures that hold the description of interactive objects, their interactions and network-agnostic data routing. As an example, once the XML description in Figure 8, on the left, is parsed, the JavaScript code in the same Figure, on the right, is generated that allows the Ecosystem Server to manage events from the Entity that holds such sensor; in this case it will turn on the LED on another entity if the distance is lesser than 10 cm. The Ecosystem Code Generator also generates the source code source code for the user interface of display-enabled objects (a HTML5-CSS-JavaScript webpage), which can be executed by scanning an auto-generated QR-Code. This avoids writing the URL of the generated interface on the target device.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

No MeSH data available.