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Crossed nonfused renal ectopia with variant blood vessels: a rare congenital renal anomaly

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Crossed renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly, where one of the kidneys crosses the midline and lies opposite to the site of its normal ureteral insertion. Ninety percent of crossed ectopic kidneys are fused to their ipsilateral uncrossed kidney. Crossed renal ectopia without fusion is rare. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with an unusual incidental finding of crossed nonfused renal ectopia, with the left ectopic kidney lying anterior to the right kidney without fusion. The ectopic kidney had dual arterial supply: one from the aorta and another from the right renal artery. It also demonstrated dual venous drainage; a main left renal vein and an accessory renal vein. The main left renal vein joined the right renal vein to form a common renal vein before draining into the inferior vena cava. The accessory renal vein joined the left testicular and left lumbar veins to drain into the inferior vena cava. Multiple bilateral nonobstructing renal calculi were also noted. Although the patient was asymptomatic, the authors highlight potential complications related to the above-mentioned condition and the importance of identification of the findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Coronal (A) and sagittal (B) views of contrast-enhanced CT abdomen showing the origin of the left renal artery (arrow) from the right renal artery and entering the upper pole of the ectopic kidney (arrowhead).
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fig4: Coronal (A) and sagittal (B) views of contrast-enhanced CT abdomen showing the origin of the left renal artery (arrow) from the right renal artery and entering the upper pole of the ectopic kidney (arrowhead).

Mentions: The arterial supply showed marked variation. The ectopic left kidney was noted to have a dual blood supply with the supplying arteries going through the renal capsule instead of the normal route through the renal hilum. The left renal artery originated from the aorta just lateral to the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery, ascending in a spiral manner and entering the left ectopic kidney in the lower pole by piercing the renal capsule (Fig. 3). The second artery, arising as a branch from the right renal artery about 4 cm from its origin, supplied the upper pole of the ectopic kidney (Fig. 4). The right kidney was supplied normally by the right renal artery originating from the aorta. Dual venous drainage of the ectopic kidney was also noted with one main left renal vein seen emerging from the renal hilum of the ectopic kidney and joining the right renal vein to form a short confluence before draining into the lateral aspect of the inferior vena cava (IVC) on the right side (Fig. 5). Another smaller accessory renal vein was seen emerging from the mid pole of the ectopic kidney, and joining the left testicular and left lumbar veins to drain into the IVC on the left side (Fig. 6).


Crossed nonfused renal ectopia with variant blood vessels: a rare congenital renal anomaly
Coronal (A) and sagittal (B) views of contrast-enhanced CT abdomen showing the origin of the left renal artery (arrow) from the right renal artery and entering the upper pole of the ectopic kidney (arrowhead).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5310254&req=5

fig4: Coronal (A) and sagittal (B) views of contrast-enhanced CT abdomen showing the origin of the left renal artery (arrow) from the right renal artery and entering the upper pole of the ectopic kidney (arrowhead).
Mentions: The arterial supply showed marked variation. The ectopic left kidney was noted to have a dual blood supply with the supplying arteries going through the renal capsule instead of the normal route through the renal hilum. The left renal artery originated from the aorta just lateral to the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery, ascending in a spiral manner and entering the left ectopic kidney in the lower pole by piercing the renal capsule (Fig. 3). The second artery, arising as a branch from the right renal artery about 4 cm from its origin, supplied the upper pole of the ectopic kidney (Fig. 4). The right kidney was supplied normally by the right renal artery originating from the aorta. Dual venous drainage of the ectopic kidney was also noted with one main left renal vein seen emerging from the renal hilum of the ectopic kidney and joining the right renal vein to form a short confluence before draining into the lateral aspect of the inferior vena cava (IVC) on the right side (Fig. 5). Another smaller accessory renal vein was seen emerging from the mid pole of the ectopic kidney, and joining the left testicular and left lumbar veins to drain into the IVC on the left side (Fig. 6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Crossed renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly, where one of the kidneys crosses the midline and lies opposite to the site of its normal ureteral insertion. Ninety percent of crossed ectopic kidneys are fused to their ipsilateral uncrossed kidney. Crossed renal ectopia without fusion is rare. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with an unusual incidental finding of crossed nonfused renal ectopia, with the left ectopic kidney lying anterior to the right kidney without fusion. The ectopic kidney had dual arterial supply: one from the aorta and another from the right renal artery. It also demonstrated dual venous drainage; a main left renal vein and an accessory renal vein. The main left renal vein joined the right renal vein to form a common renal vein before draining into the inferior vena cava. The accessory renal vein joined the left testicular and left lumbar veins to drain into the inferior vena cava. Multiple bilateral nonobstructing renal calculi were also noted. Although the patient was asymptomatic, the authors highlight potential complications related to the above-mentioned condition and the importance of identification of the findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus