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Spontaneous Deposition of Prussian Blue on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and the Application in an Amperometric Biosensor

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ABSTRACT

A simple method has been developed for the spontaneous deposition of Prussian blue (PB) particles from a solution containing only ferricyanide ions onto conducting substrates such as indium tin oxide glass, glassy carbon disk and carbon nanotube (CNT) materials. Formation of PB deposits was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrometry and electrochemical techniques. The surface morphology of the PB particles deposited on the substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. CNT/PB composite modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibited an electrocatalytic property for hydrogen peroxide reduction. These modified electrodes exhibited a high sensitivity for electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide at −0.05 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), probably due to the synergistic effect of CNT with PB. Then, CNT/PB modified electrodes were further developed as amperometric glucose biosensors. These biosensors offered a linear response to glucose concentration from 0.1 to 0.9 mM with good selectivity, high sensitivity of 0.102 A M−1 cm−2 and short response time (within 2 s) at a negative operation potential of −0.05 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The detection limit was estimated to be 0.01 mM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

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Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of different electrodes: (a) GC/CNT, (b) GC/PB, and (c) GC/CNT/PB.
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nanomaterials-02-00428-f002: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of different electrodes: (a) GC/CNT, (b) GC/PB, and (c) GC/CNT/PB.

Mentions: The morphology of PB deposits on the GC/CNT and bare GC electrode surface were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the average size of the PB deposits was estimated. Figure 2a shows the SEM image of purified CNT materials dispersed on a GC surface. The cylindrical CNT materials exhibited a three-dimensional network structure with an average diameter of approximately 40 nm. PB deposits were also formed on the GC surface when a bare GC electrode was immersed in the acidic Fe(CN)63− solution overnight. SEM results demonstrated that spontaneous deposition of PB on different substrates from a single acidic Fe(CN)63− solution had been realized. Figure 2b displays a small number of PB particles formed on the GC surface. The PB particles exhibited a cubic crystal form with side length between 60 and 150 nm. When the GC/CNT electrode was immersed in acidic Fe(CN)63− solution for 24 h, PB particles were deposited on the GC surface, as evidenced by the SEM image shown in Figure 2c. This result was consistent with the deposition of PB on the ITO/CNT surface as shown by the AFM studies. PB particles were successfully immobilised on different substrate surfaces from a solution containing only Fe(CN)63− ions. A larger number of PB particles and clusters were homogeneously distributed throughout the GC/CNT surface with size between 70 and 200 nm, slightly larger than the PB particles formed on bare GC.


Spontaneous Deposition of Prussian Blue on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and the Application in an Amperometric Biosensor
Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of different electrodes: (a) GC/CNT, (b) GC/PB, and (c) GC/CNT/PB.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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nanomaterials-02-00428-f002: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of different electrodes: (a) GC/CNT, (b) GC/PB, and (c) GC/CNT/PB.
Mentions: The morphology of PB deposits on the GC/CNT and bare GC electrode surface were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the average size of the PB deposits was estimated. Figure 2a shows the SEM image of purified CNT materials dispersed on a GC surface. The cylindrical CNT materials exhibited a three-dimensional network structure with an average diameter of approximately 40 nm. PB deposits were also formed on the GC surface when a bare GC electrode was immersed in the acidic Fe(CN)63− solution overnight. SEM results demonstrated that spontaneous deposition of PB on different substrates from a single acidic Fe(CN)63− solution had been realized. Figure 2b displays a small number of PB particles formed on the GC surface. The PB particles exhibited a cubic crystal form with side length between 60 and 150 nm. When the GC/CNT electrode was immersed in acidic Fe(CN)63− solution for 24 h, PB particles were deposited on the GC surface, as evidenced by the SEM image shown in Figure 2c. This result was consistent with the deposition of PB on the ITO/CNT surface as shown by the AFM studies. PB particles were successfully immobilised on different substrate surfaces from a solution containing only Fe(CN)63− ions. A larger number of PB particles and clusters were homogeneously distributed throughout the GC/CNT surface with size between 70 and 200 nm, slightly larger than the PB particles formed on bare GC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A simple method has been developed for the spontaneous deposition of Prussian blue (PB) particles from a solution containing only ferricyanide ions onto conducting substrates such as indium tin oxide glass, glassy carbon disk and carbon nanotube (CNT) materials. Formation of PB deposits was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrometry and electrochemical techniques. The surface morphology of the PB particles deposited on the substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. CNT/PB composite modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibited an electrocatalytic property for hydrogen peroxide reduction. These modified electrodes exhibited a high sensitivity for electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide at −0.05 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), probably due to the synergistic effect of CNT with PB. Then, CNT/PB modified electrodes were further developed as amperometric glucose biosensors. These biosensors offered a linear response to glucose concentration from 0.1 to 0.9 mM with good selectivity, high sensitivity of 0.102 A M−1 cm−2 and short response time (within 2 s) at a negative operation potential of −0.05 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The detection limit was estimated to be 0.01 mM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

No MeSH data available.