Limits...
Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were dispersed uniformly through the polymer matrix, which presented a major improvement over prior techniques. The dispersion procedure was optimized via extended experimentation, which is discussed in detail.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM images showing dispersed MWCNTs on a cross section of polymer nanocomposite that was fractured in liquid nitrogen. Nanocomposite contains around 7 wt.% of functionalized carbon nanotubes throughout its matrix. Observation was made on same area of surface with following increasing magnification: (a) 160×; (b) 1000×; (c) 3000×; and (d) 10,000×.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304599&req=5

nanomaterials-02-00329-f007: SEM images showing dispersed MWCNTs on a cross section of polymer nanocomposite that was fractured in liquid nitrogen. Nanocomposite contains around 7 wt.% of functionalized carbon nanotubes throughout its matrix. Observation was made on same area of surface with following increasing magnification: (a) 160×; (b) 1000×; (c) 3000×; and (d) 10,000×.

Mentions: In the final polymer nanocomposite, it is difficult to use optical microscopy to directly observe the bulk dispersion of CNTs within polymer matrix, especially for those nanocomposite having a high loading percentage (>1%) of CNTs, since the samples normally become optically non-transparent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), on the other hand, provides a tool for observing the inside of a bulk sample. For example, a PDMS-MWCNTs nanocomposite sample containing functionalized MWCNTs was fractured in liquid nitrogen to obtain a cross section, and viewed under SEM, as in Figure 7.


Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations
SEM images showing dispersed MWCNTs on a cross section of polymer nanocomposite that was fractured in liquid nitrogen. Nanocomposite contains around 7 wt.% of functionalized carbon nanotubes throughout its matrix. Observation was made on same area of surface with following increasing magnification: (a) 160×; (b) 1000×; (c) 3000×; and (d) 10,000×.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304599&req=5

nanomaterials-02-00329-f007: SEM images showing dispersed MWCNTs on a cross section of polymer nanocomposite that was fractured in liquid nitrogen. Nanocomposite contains around 7 wt.% of functionalized carbon nanotubes throughout its matrix. Observation was made on same area of surface with following increasing magnification: (a) 160×; (b) 1000×; (c) 3000×; and (d) 10,000×.
Mentions: In the final polymer nanocomposite, it is difficult to use optical microscopy to directly observe the bulk dispersion of CNTs within polymer matrix, especially for those nanocomposite having a high loading percentage (>1%) of CNTs, since the samples normally become optically non-transparent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), on the other hand, provides a tool for observing the inside of a bulk sample. For example, a PDMS-MWCNTs nanocomposite sample containing functionalized MWCNTs was fractured in liquid nitrogen to obtain a cross section, and viewed under SEM, as in Figure 7.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were dispersed uniformly through the polymer matrix, which presented a major improvement over prior techniques. The dispersion procedure was optimized via extended experimentation, which is discussed in detail.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus