Limits...
Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of the QCM sensor responses for the imprinted titania layer and nanoparticles to different capric acid concentrations. The inside graph shows the frequency responses when shifted from fresh oil to waste oil; nanoparticle electrode offers a better response. Adopted from [82].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304596&req=5

nanomaterials-03-00615-f006: Comparison of the QCM sensor responses for the imprinted titania layer and nanoparticles to different capric acid concentrations. The inside graph shows the frequency responses when shifted from fresh oil to waste oil; nanoparticle electrode offers a better response. Adopted from [82].

Mentions: A mass sensitive sensor based on imprinted TiO2 nanoparticles deposited on QCM for engine oil degradation sensing was fabricated by Lieberzeit et al. [42]. The size of imprinted titania particles was in the range of 200–300 nm. Imp-TiO2-NPs showed enhanced uptake of capric acid, i.e., the template, in comparison with the corresponding sol-gel films, thus making this approach highly compatible for industrial processes [42]. The same group later explored further strategies based on imprinted titania materials, i.e., TiO2 nanoparticles or sol-gel layers, for comparative analysis and monitoring of oxidized compounds in lubricants [82,83,84]. Imp-TiO2-NPs responded twice as high as titanate thin films, because of the higher surface area and easier diffusion within the imprinted sites of nanoparticles as compared to thin films. Figure 6 clearly shows the response of nanoparticles, which is almost double compared to that of the titanate sol-gel layer at different concentrations of capric acid.


Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications
Comparison of the QCM sensor responses for the imprinted titania layer and nanoparticles to different capric acid concentrations. The inside graph shows the frequency responses when shifted from fresh oil to waste oil; nanoparticle electrode offers a better response. Adopted from [82].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304596&req=5

nanomaterials-03-00615-f006: Comparison of the QCM sensor responses for the imprinted titania layer and nanoparticles to different capric acid concentrations. The inside graph shows the frequency responses when shifted from fresh oil to waste oil; nanoparticle electrode offers a better response. Adopted from [82].
Mentions: A mass sensitive sensor based on imprinted TiO2 nanoparticles deposited on QCM for engine oil degradation sensing was fabricated by Lieberzeit et al. [42]. The size of imprinted titania particles was in the range of 200–300 nm. Imp-TiO2-NPs showed enhanced uptake of capric acid, i.e., the template, in comparison with the corresponding sol-gel films, thus making this approach highly compatible for industrial processes [42]. The same group later explored further strategies based on imprinted titania materials, i.e., TiO2 nanoparticles or sol-gel layers, for comparative analysis and monitoring of oxidized compounds in lubricants [82,83,84]. Imp-TiO2-NPs responded twice as high as titanate thin films, because of the higher surface area and easier diffusion within the imprinted sites of nanoparticles as compared to thin films. Figure 6 clearly shows the response of nanoparticles, which is almost double compared to that of the titanate sol-gel layer at different concentrations of capric acid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors.

No MeSH data available.