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Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

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ABSTRACT

Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors.

No MeSH data available.


Selectivity comparison of Au-NPs/MIP/GCE (glassy carbon electrode), adopted from [59]. Use parenthesis for µA.
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nanomaterials-03-00615-f003: Selectivity comparison of Au-NPs/MIP/GCE (glassy carbon electrode), adopted from [59]. Use parenthesis for µA.

Mentions: For the first time, Mosbach and coworkers [79] introduced the concept of electrochemical sensors based on imprinted materials. They designed a phenylalanine anilide sensor that worked as a field effect capacitor, i.e., a reduction in capacitance was observed upon exposure to the target analyte. Later, an electrochemical sensor using gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) was extensively fabricated by many researchers for chemical analysis [59,60,61,62]. Au-NPs were deposited on a pre-formed layer of an electro-polymerized o-phenylenediamine coated glassy carbon electrode. The experimental studies revealed that the sensor exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity with a suitable detection limit of 1.0 × 10−7 mol L−1 for theophylline. The selectivity studies are revealed in Figure 3, where the response of interfering species along with the target analyte is shown [59].


Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications
Selectivity comparison of Au-NPs/MIP/GCE (glassy carbon electrode), adopted from [59]. Use parenthesis for µA.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304596&req=5

nanomaterials-03-00615-f003: Selectivity comparison of Au-NPs/MIP/GCE (glassy carbon electrode), adopted from [59]. Use parenthesis for µA.
Mentions: For the first time, Mosbach and coworkers [79] introduced the concept of electrochemical sensors based on imprinted materials. They designed a phenylalanine anilide sensor that worked as a field effect capacitor, i.e., a reduction in capacitance was observed upon exposure to the target analyte. Later, an electrochemical sensor using gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) was extensively fabricated by many researchers for chemical analysis [59,60,61,62]. Au-NPs were deposited on a pre-formed layer of an electro-polymerized o-phenylenediamine coated glassy carbon electrode. The experimental studies revealed that the sensor exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity with a suitable detection limit of 1.0 × 10−7 mol L−1 for theophylline. The selectivity studies are revealed in Figure 3, where the response of interfering species along with the target analyte is shown [59].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors.

No MeSH data available.