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The assessment of data sources for influenza virologic surveillance in New York State

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Following the 2013 USA release of the Influenza Virologic Surveillance Right Size Roadmap, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) embarked on an evaluation of data sources for influenza virologic surveillance.

Objective: To assess NYS data sources, additional to data generated by the state public health laboratory (PHL), which could enhance influenza surveillance at the state and national level.

Methods: Potential sources of laboratory test data for influenza were analyzed for quantity and quality. Computer models, designed to assess sample sizes and the confidence of data for statistical representation of influenza activity, were used to compare PHL test data to results from clinical and commercial laboratories, reported between June 8, 2013 and May 31, 2014.

Results: Sample sizes tested for influenza at the state PHL were sufficient for situational awareness surveillance with optimal confidence levels, only during peak weeks of the influenza season. Influenza data pooled from NYS PHLs and clinical laboratories generated optimal confidence levels for situational awareness throughout the influenza season. For novel influenza virus detection in NYS, combined real‐time (rt) RT‐PCR data from state and regional PHLs achieved ≥85% confidence during peak influenza activity, and ≥95% confidence for most of low season and all of off‐season.

Conclusions: In NYS, combined data from clinical, commercial, and public health laboratories generated optimal influenza surveillance for situational awareness throughout the season. Statistical confidence for novel virus detection, which is reliant on only PHL data, was achieved for most of the year.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

NYS map showing the 39 counties of 57 total outside of NYC that contribute to the ILINet and EIP influenza virologic surveillance networks. Counties participating in the EIP program are clustered around the cities of Albany and Rochester. The distribution of the ILINet primary care practitioners is indicated by number in each county and include the following practice types: pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine, student health, urgent care, obstetrics/gynecology, allergy and asthma, ear nose and throat, employee health, infectious disease, and pulmonology. Gray counties do not have providers enrolled in either the ILINet or EIP. The NYS map also depicts the 11 NREVSS laboratories and the 11 WHO collaborating laboratories, which include the NYS PHL in Albany and the three regional PHLs in Erie and Westchester Counties and NYC
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irv12433-fig-0001: NYS map showing the 39 counties of 57 total outside of NYC that contribute to the ILINet and EIP influenza virologic surveillance networks. Counties participating in the EIP program are clustered around the cities of Albany and Rochester. The distribution of the ILINet primary care practitioners is indicated by number in each county and include the following practice types: pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine, student health, urgent care, obstetrics/gynecology, allergy and asthma, ear nose and throat, employee health, infectious disease, and pulmonology. Gray counties do not have providers enrolled in either the ILINet or EIP. The NYS map also depicts the 11 NREVSS laboratories and the 11 WHO collaborating laboratories, which include the NYS PHL in Albany and the three regional PHLs in Erie and Westchester Counties and NYC

Mentions: The ILINet is an outpatient influenza surveillance program supported by CDC in all states.3 For the 2013‐2014 season, the NYSDOH ILINet Program had 173 participating primary care physicians (ILINet providers) in 39 of the 57 NYS counties outside of New York City, from a variety of medical practice specialties 4 (Figure 1). ILINet providers report data and submit specimens from patients with medically attended influenza‐like illness (MA‐ILI). The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH) coordinates a separate ILINet Program in the five counties of NYC.


The assessment of data sources for influenza virologic surveillance in New York State
NYS map showing the 39 counties of 57 total outside of NYC that contribute to the ILINet and EIP influenza virologic surveillance networks. Counties participating in the EIP program are clustered around the cities of Albany and Rochester. The distribution of the ILINet primary care practitioners is indicated by number in each county and include the following practice types: pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine, student health, urgent care, obstetrics/gynecology, allergy and asthma, ear nose and throat, employee health, infectious disease, and pulmonology. Gray counties do not have providers enrolled in either the ILINet or EIP. The NYS map also depicts the 11 NREVSS laboratories and the 11 WHO collaborating laboratories, which include the NYS PHL in Albany and the three regional PHLs in Erie and Westchester Counties and NYC
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304574&req=5

irv12433-fig-0001: NYS map showing the 39 counties of 57 total outside of NYC that contribute to the ILINet and EIP influenza virologic surveillance networks. Counties participating in the EIP program are clustered around the cities of Albany and Rochester. The distribution of the ILINet primary care practitioners is indicated by number in each county and include the following practice types: pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine, student health, urgent care, obstetrics/gynecology, allergy and asthma, ear nose and throat, employee health, infectious disease, and pulmonology. Gray counties do not have providers enrolled in either the ILINet or EIP. The NYS map also depicts the 11 NREVSS laboratories and the 11 WHO collaborating laboratories, which include the NYS PHL in Albany and the three regional PHLs in Erie and Westchester Counties and NYC
Mentions: The ILINet is an outpatient influenza surveillance program supported by CDC in all states.3 For the 2013‐2014 season, the NYSDOH ILINet Program had 173 participating primary care physicians (ILINet providers) in 39 of the 57 NYS counties outside of New York City, from a variety of medical practice specialties 4 (Figure 1). ILINet providers report data and submit specimens from patients with medically attended influenza‐like illness (MA‐ILI). The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH) coordinates a separate ILINet Program in the five counties of NYC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Following the 2013 USA release of the Influenza Virologic Surveillance Right Size Roadmap, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) embarked on an evaluation of data sources for influenza virologic surveillance.

Objective: To assess NYS data sources, additional to data generated by the state public health laboratory (PHL), which could enhance influenza surveillance at the state and national level.

Methods: Potential sources of laboratory test data for influenza were analyzed for quantity and quality. Computer models, designed to assess sample sizes and the confidence of data for statistical representation of influenza activity, were used to compare PHL test data to results from clinical and commercial laboratories, reported between June 8, 2013 and May 31, 2014.

Results: Sample sizes tested for influenza at the state PHL were sufficient for situational awareness surveillance with optimal confidence levels, only during peak weeks of the influenza season. Influenza data pooled from NYS PHLs and clinical laboratories generated optimal confidence levels for situational awareness throughout the influenza season. For novel influenza virus detection in NYS, combined real‐time (rt) RT‐PCR data from state and regional PHLs achieved ≥85% confidence during peak influenza activity, and ≥95% confidence for most of low season and all of off‐season.

Conclusions: In NYS, combined data from clinical, commercial, and public health laboratories generated optimal influenza surveillance for situational awareness throughout the season. Statistical confidence for novel virus detection, which is reliant on only PHL data, was achieved for most of the year.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus