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Brain Symmetry Index in Healthy and Stroke Patients for Assessment and Prognosis

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective. Quantitative neurophysiological signal parameters are of value in predicting motor recovery after stroke. The novel role of EEG-derived brain symmetry index for motor function prognostication in the subacute phase after stroke is explored. Methods. Ten male stroke patients and ten matched healthy controls were recruited. Motor function was first assessed clinically using the MRC score, its derivative Motricity Index, and the Fugl–Meyer assessment score. EEG was subsequently recorded first with subjects at rest and then during hand grasping motions, triggered by visual cues. Brain symmetry index (BSI) was used to identify the differences in EEG-quantified interhemispheric cortical power asymmetry observable in healthy versus cortical and subcortical stroke patients. Subsequently, any correlation between BSI and motor function was explored. Results. BSI was found to be significantly higher in stroke subjects compared to healthy controls (p = 0.023). The difference in BSI was more pronounced in the cortical stroke subgroup (p = 0.016). BSI showed only a mild general decrease on repeated monthly recording. Notably, a statistically significant correlation was observed between early BSI and Fugl–Meyer score later in recovery (p < 0.050). Conclusions. Brain symmetry index is increased in the subacute poststroke phase and correlates with motor function 1-2 months after stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Correlation of brain symmetry index at rest recorded during the first session (BSIc1) with (a) Motricity Index in the first (MI1, blue) and second session (MI2, green) and with (b) Fugl–Meyer in the first (FM1, blue) and second session (FM2, green).
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fig2: Correlation of brain symmetry index at rest recorded during the first session (BSIc1) with (a) Motricity Index in the first (MI1, blue) and second session (MI2, green) and with (b) Fugl–Meyer in the first (FM1, blue) and second session (FM2, green).

Mentions: Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Product and Service Solution® (SPSS; v.20.0) software package for Windows®. Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine any statistically significant differences between population subgroup while Spearman's correlation was used to identify any significant correlation trends. The statistical significance level was set at p < 0.05. Asterisks in Figures 1–3 indicate which comparative analysis testing achieved this statistical significance level of p < 0.05.


Brain Symmetry Index in Healthy and Stroke Patients for Assessment and Prognosis
Correlation of brain symmetry index at rest recorded during the first session (BSIc1) with (a) Motricity Index in the first (MI1, blue) and second session (MI2, green) and with (b) Fugl–Meyer in the first (FM1, blue) and second session (FM2, green).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304313&req=5

fig2: Correlation of brain symmetry index at rest recorded during the first session (BSIc1) with (a) Motricity Index in the first (MI1, blue) and second session (MI2, green) and with (b) Fugl–Meyer in the first (FM1, blue) and second session (FM2, green).
Mentions: Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Product and Service Solution® (SPSS; v.20.0) software package for Windows®. Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine any statistically significant differences between population subgroup while Spearman's correlation was used to identify any significant correlation trends. The statistical significance level was set at p < 0.05. Asterisks in Figures 1–3 indicate which comparative analysis testing achieved this statistical significance level of p < 0.05.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective. Quantitative neurophysiological signal parameters are of value in predicting motor recovery after stroke. The novel role of EEG-derived brain symmetry index for motor function prognostication in the subacute phase after stroke is explored. Methods. Ten male stroke patients and ten matched healthy controls were recruited. Motor function was first assessed clinically using the MRC score, its derivative Motricity Index, and the Fugl&ndash;Meyer assessment score. EEG was subsequently recorded first with subjects at rest and then during hand grasping motions, triggered by visual cues. Brain symmetry index (BSI) was used to identify the differences in EEG-quantified interhemispheric cortical power asymmetry observable in healthy versus cortical and subcortical stroke patients. Subsequently, any correlation between BSI and motor function was explored. Results. BSI was found to be significantly higher in stroke subjects compared to healthy controls (p = 0.023). The difference in BSI was more pronounced in the cortical stroke subgroup (p = 0.016). BSI showed only a mild general decrease on repeated monthly recording. Notably, a statistically significant correlation was observed between early BSI and Fugl&ndash;Meyer score later in recovery (p &lt; 0.050). Conclusions. Brain symmetry index is increased in the subacute poststroke phase and correlates with motor function 1-2 months after stroke.

No MeSH data available.