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Paenibacillus polymyxa NSY50 suppresses Fusarium wilt in cucumbers by regulating the rhizospheric microbial community

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Paenibacillus polymyxa (P. polymyxa) NSY50, isolated from vinegar residue substrate, suppresses the growth of Fusarium oxysporum in the cucumber rhizosphere and protects the host plant from pathogen invasion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of NSY50 application on cucumber growth, soil properties and composition of the rhizospheric soil microbial community after exposure to Fusarium oxysporum. Bacterial and fungal communities were investigated by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (ITS1 and ITS2). The results showed that NSY50 effectively reduced the incidence of Fusarium wilt (56.4%) by altering the soil physico-chemical properties (e.g., pH, Cmic, Rmic, total N and Corg) and enzyme activities, especially of urease and β-glucosidase, which were significantly increased by 2.25- and 2.64-fold, respectively, relative to the pathogen treatment condition. More specifically, NSY50 application reduced the abundance of Fusarium and promoted potentially beneficial groups, including the Bacillus, Actinobacteria, Streptomyces, Actinospica, Catenulispora and Pseudomonas genera. Thus, our results suggest that NSY50 application can improve soil properties, shift the microbial community by increasing beneficial strains and decreasing pathogen colonization in the cucumber rhizosphere, and reduce the occurrence of cucumber Fusarium wilt, thereby promoting cucumber growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hierarchical cluster tree constructed based on a distance matrix calculated using the unweighted UniFrac algorithm for the soil samples collected from the four treatment conditions (CK, untreated plants (control); NSY50, plants challenged with NSY50 (2.5 × 108 CFU/mL); FOC, plants challenged with FOC (1 × 108 CFU/mL); NSY50 + FOC: plants challenged with NSY50 for 3 days and then with FOC) 30 days after FOC inoculation.(a) bacteria; (b) fungi. Note: the different numbers (1, 2, 3) after the letters for all treatments indicate the three replicates. The letters NSY in the graph replace NSY50 to avoid confusion.
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f4: Hierarchical cluster tree constructed based on a distance matrix calculated using the unweighted UniFrac algorithm for the soil samples collected from the four treatment conditions (CK, untreated plants (control); NSY50, plants challenged with NSY50 (2.5 × 108 CFU/mL); FOC, plants challenged with FOC (1 × 108 CFU/mL); NSY50 + FOC: plants challenged with NSY50 for 3 days and then with FOC) 30 days after FOC inoculation.(a) bacteria; (b) fungi. Note: the different numbers (1, 2, 3) after the letters for all treatments indicate the three replicates. The letters NSY in the graph replace NSY50 to avoid confusion.

Mentions: Hierarchical clustering analysis, calculated using the unweighted UniFrac algorithm, showed that the community structures of the bacteria and fungi collected from the soils receiving the same treatment were clustered together (Fig. 4). Soil pre-treated with NSY50 and soil treated with FOC were clearly separated from each other. In addition, PCA showed that the four treatments affected the communities differently (See Supplementary Fig. S2). Of the total variance in the data set, the first two principal components together explained 75.46% and 98.14% of the total bacterial and fungal community, respectively. In bacteria, the first principal component (PC1) was the most important, accounting for 58.26% of the total variation. The community structure may be largely responsible for these changes. Overall, PERMANOVA revealed significant differences for all OTUs according to treatment (bacteria, R2 = 0.6403, P = 0.001; fungi, R2 = 0.9536, P = 0.001).


Paenibacillus polymyxa NSY50 suppresses Fusarium wilt in cucumbers by regulating the rhizospheric microbial community
Hierarchical cluster tree constructed based on a distance matrix calculated using the unweighted UniFrac algorithm for the soil samples collected from the four treatment conditions (CK, untreated plants (control); NSY50, plants challenged with NSY50 (2.5 × 108 CFU/mL); FOC, plants challenged with FOC (1 × 108 CFU/mL); NSY50 + FOC: plants challenged with NSY50 for 3 days and then with FOC) 30 days after FOC inoculation.(a) bacteria; (b) fungi. Note: the different numbers (1, 2, 3) after the letters for all treatments indicate the three replicates. The letters NSY in the graph replace NSY50 to avoid confusion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304210&req=5

f4: Hierarchical cluster tree constructed based on a distance matrix calculated using the unweighted UniFrac algorithm for the soil samples collected from the four treatment conditions (CK, untreated plants (control); NSY50, plants challenged with NSY50 (2.5 × 108 CFU/mL); FOC, plants challenged with FOC (1 × 108 CFU/mL); NSY50 + FOC: plants challenged with NSY50 for 3 days and then with FOC) 30 days after FOC inoculation.(a) bacteria; (b) fungi. Note: the different numbers (1, 2, 3) after the letters for all treatments indicate the three replicates. The letters NSY in the graph replace NSY50 to avoid confusion.
Mentions: Hierarchical clustering analysis, calculated using the unweighted UniFrac algorithm, showed that the community structures of the bacteria and fungi collected from the soils receiving the same treatment were clustered together (Fig. 4). Soil pre-treated with NSY50 and soil treated with FOC were clearly separated from each other. In addition, PCA showed that the four treatments affected the communities differently (See Supplementary Fig. S2). Of the total variance in the data set, the first two principal components together explained 75.46% and 98.14% of the total bacterial and fungal community, respectively. In bacteria, the first principal component (PC1) was the most important, accounting for 58.26% of the total variation. The community structure may be largely responsible for these changes. Overall, PERMANOVA revealed significant differences for all OTUs according to treatment (bacteria, R2 = 0.6403, P = 0.001; fungi, R2 = 0.9536, P = 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Paenibacillus polymyxa (P. polymyxa) NSY50, isolated from vinegar residue substrate, suppresses the growth of Fusarium oxysporum in the cucumber rhizosphere and protects the host plant from pathogen invasion. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of NSY50 application on cucumber growth, soil properties and composition of the rhizospheric soil microbial community after exposure to Fusarium oxysporum. Bacterial and fungal communities were investigated by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (ITS1 and ITS2). The results showed that NSY50 effectively reduced the incidence of Fusarium wilt (56.4%) by altering the soil physico-chemical properties (e.g., pH, Cmic, Rmic, total N and Corg) and enzyme activities, especially of urease and β-glucosidase, which were significantly increased by 2.25- and 2.64-fold, respectively, relative to the pathogen treatment condition. More specifically, NSY50 application reduced the abundance of Fusarium and promoted potentially beneficial groups, including the Bacillus, Actinobacteria, Streptomyces, Actinospica, Catenulispora and Pseudomonas genera. Thus, our results suggest that NSY50 application can improve soil properties, shift the microbial community by increasing beneficial strains and decreasing pathogen colonization in the cucumber rhizosphere, and reduce the occurrence of cucumber Fusarium wilt, thereby promoting cucumber growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus